São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

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São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Wed Sep 28, 2011 8:00 pm

The first round immediately brought the largest clash, with both Anand and Carlsen paired against each other. However, possibly due to it being the first round, and neither having gotten into fifth gear yet, the game between the two highest rated players was a non-starter as a Berlin quickly extinguished into exchanges and a lifeless ending with opposite-colored bishops.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 A very popular opening on the board and theoretical battle ahead: Berlin defence
6... dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 h6 Carlsen chooses a little side line 9...h6, currently 9...Ke8 10.h3 h5 is main line
10. h3 Ne7 I can say, I am very happy to see 10...Ne7! I played it myself soo many times with Black. I think I even played this line with Black against Magnus in Dortmund 2009. (see game here) Magnus played an interesting line with 11.Bf4, but in my opinion the main move should be 11.Be3
11. Be3 yes, Vishy is choosing of course the main! Now 11...Ke8( idea is to play now Nd5, Blacks basic idea is actually to exchange one pair of knights, after which Black are doing more than fine) 12.Rad1 Bd7
11... Ke8 12. Rad1 Bd7 now Black wants to play Rd8 and Bc8 back with a one rook exchange which is almost in all cases clearly a good idea for Black as pointed both in the September and July issues. 13.Rfe1 is the usual move now
13. a3 Rd8 The position is much more complicated than it looks. Every move must be played very carefull in the Berlin defence for both colours. White can get also very quickly in danger. Black only needs to exchange one pair of rooks, than maybe a knight if possible and Black position is already clearly better. For more details in similar setup, check out the expert videos here
14. Rfe1 14.Rfe1-back to the main line. I had this position many years ago in my game against Shirov, he was the first one trying this tricky move a3. I replied now 14...a6 which is not bad at all. Currently at 14...Bc8 15.Ba7!? is probably possible
14... a6 yes 14...a6, now Black simply wants to play Bc8. Shirov continued here with 15.Ne4 in this position.
15. Ne4 It doesnt seems to me that White is greatly prepared here. Anand is usually playing very quick in positions he knows well. This time Magnus is finally taking his time. In my opinion Black's best move is 15...Bc8
15... Bf5 Magnus is choosing in my opinion "not the best" move, the same that I also played against Shirov 15...Bf5. I got quickly into big trouble. The main point is: with pawn on a2-a7 Bf5 is the best with pawns on a3-a6 Bc8 is the stronger one. Why: not so easy to explain Smile. But in one line I think we can make a good example: if now 16.Bd2!? Ng6 17.g4 Be6 18.Ng3 Bd5 19.Nh2 and White are doing good, with pawn on a2 and a7 Black would have Bxa2! and at move b3 Bb1! very pretty idea
16. Nc5 16.Nc5, this move of Anand I dont like... White should always try to keep the pair of rooks on the board.
16... Rxd1 17. Rxd1 Bc8 It is pity for us, but I guess we willl see soon a short draw. Pity that Vishy didnt try the 16.Bd2, would be very nice to see what Magnus planned to do on it...
18. Nd3 maybe now 18...b6 is not a bad idea, Black wants to play c5, Bb7 with a very nice position
18... Ng6 Magnus is choosing 18...Ng6, also a very solid move, but now White can make a draw after 19.Bc5. I would have played already for a win with Black by playing 18...b6!? I think White should take the chance and play 19.Bc5, hard to imagine White having chances for any advantage here
19. Nf4 I might be wrong, but I think World Champion is today in a very bad shape. 19.Nf4?! in my opinion simply a mistake. Now after 19...Nxf4 20.Bxf4 c5 21.e6 ( what else, Black wants to play Be6) 21...Be6 22.Bc7 Be7 followed by f6, Kf7 and I think only Black can be better. Strange that Carlsen is thinking here soo much, maybe a draw offer from White? The Sofia rules will prevent that, and we will see more moves.
19... Nxf4 20. Bxf4 Be7 Good move! No need to hurry with c5. I think White should in any case play e6. If Black manages to play c5 and Be6 it could be already to late...
21. Nd4 Vishy is really playing with fire to get into a worse endgame. 21...c5 seems to be unclear because of 22.Nb3 Bf5!? (22...b6 23.e6 Bxe6 24.Bxc7 b5 25.Bb6! and White are little better) 23.Rd2 b6 24.e6 and maybe Bg5!? leaving White with a horrible knigh on b3
21... Bc5 21...Bc5 very safe. Again Magnus is not trying to win the game, I can say-pity, would have been logical to see Anand suffering a bit for his unfortune play in the opening. I am sure that Vishy himself would not let out such a chance to play for a win with Black! 22.e6 seems to be again a total draw
22. Be3 All commentary by GM Arkadij Naiditsch author of Chess Evolution material, expect videos later at the video section
22... Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Ke7 draw is in the air. White still got some mini chances, but they are super mini. Black needs only to find a way to play Ke7 in a good moment
24. f3 yes, White can't stop Black's Rh8-d8, so it is a draw. Quite a boring start...we expected more from the two chess geniuses.
24... Rd8 25. Rxd8 Kxd8 26. g4 h5 27. Kf2 g6 28. Bg5+ Ke8 ½-½



The game between top US player, Hikaru Nakamura, and Vassily Ivanchuk, the most active top player in the circuit, was a strange affair. From the very first moves, both strove to leave the theoretical battlefield to have a war of purest chess. Sadly, this did not lead to anything excessively exotic, and few efforts were made to display their great imaginations.

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Bb4+ 3. Nd2 Nf6 4. a3 Be7 5. e4 d5 6. e5 Nfd7 7. Ngf3 a5 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Nb1 c5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11. Nc3 Be6 12. Bb5+ Nc6 13. O-O O-O 14. Be3 Rc8 15. Rb1 Nd7 16. Nxd5 Ndxe5 17. Nxe7+ Qxe7 18. Nxe5 Nxe5 19. Re1 Nc4 20. Qa4 Nxe3 21. Rxe3 b6 22. Bd3 Rfd8 23. Bf5 Qd7 24. Qxd7 Bxd7 25. Bxd7 Rxd7 26. g3 g6 27. b4 axb4 28. Rxb4 Rc6 ½-½


The only game to really break the monotony was Aronian's game against Vallejo, and this too had an unusual start. Aronian played an extremely offbeat 6.Nb1 in the Slav, and 7...Qxd4 was already the novelty. This turned out to be an unwise choice by the Spaniard playing Black, and he might have had better play choosing Vitiugov's 7...Nf6. As it were, he was unable to find a satisfactory development plan, and soon his pieces were not only uncoordinated, but struggling to leave their home squares. It was an offday for Vallejo as he made one imprecision after the other, and was soon facing a decisive attack giving Aronian the honor of first blood. The following comments are by GM Elshan Moradiabadi.

1. d4 Levon is starting as usual with the first 1.d4
1... d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 dxc4 Paco answering with Slav, which probably is a little surprize
4. e4 b5 5. a4 b4 6. Nb1 seems like it is going to be a very interesting and sharp game. Aronian is choosing the rare 6.Nb1. More often played moves are 6.Nce2 or 6.Na2. Actually there was a recent played game Sargissian-Balogh at the World Team Ch, game ended in a draw after big complications: 6...Ba6 7.Qc2 e5!? 8.Nf3 b3 9.Qc3 Nf6 with a very wild position
6... Ba6 7. Qc2 Aronian is following his "smaller" brother and playing 7.Qc2, probably he has prepared somewhere a big novelty. For sure Paco analysed this position, but probably feeling quite bad beeing afraid to play against a "stronger computer".
7... Qxd4 a novelty on the move 7...Qxd4 N. Not often we see such early novelties!
8. Nf3 Qd7 9. Bxc4 to be honest, I like much more White position, after 9.Bxc4 White are just a pawn dawn, but are already very much developed and for sure got minimum enough compensation for the pawn
9... e6 10. O-O it seems that Vallejo knows what he is doing, but looking a bit strange to me. How should Black develop?. Probaby Nf6, Be7, Qb7 Nbd7 should be the plan. But even if Black manages all that, it seems that White will be better by playing simple moves like: Be3, Nbd2, Rac1 with a pressure on the c6 pawn.
10... Nf6 We can clearly see the difference between a horrible White knight on a2 and a great one on b1, who is soon going to have a super strong position on c4. Now White got to think a bit. Idea of the future development is clear, but should White maybe take first on a6 and then continue with Be3,Nbd2, Rac1 or to play now Rd1 then Be2, Nbd2... These are small nuances, but at such a high level they can make a big difference
11. Bg5 11.Bg5 probably a better move compared to my "too solid" Be3. Definitely a good moment to think a bit for Black before it is too late. Once again I can only say, I don't like Black's position at all and hard to understand Black's desicion to go into such a dangerous line without any deep preparation.
11... Be7 12. Nbd2 12.Nbd2 hmm why not to add first 12.Rd1 Qb7 and then to play 13.Nbd2?
12... h6 12...h6?! this is not looking good at all, poor Vallejo. 13.Bxf6 Bxf6 14.e5 Be7 15.Ne4 O-O 16.Rfd1 and next Rac1
13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. Rfd1 O-O Many options for White. 1) Where to put the White knight? To e4 by playing e5 and Ne4 or to c4 by taking first on a6 or even to b3-c5. All are looking very interesting.
15. e5 Be7 Aronian is taking his time, as we all know, the most difficult in chess is, to take a disicion in a nice position with many interesting moves
16. Ne4 So final desicion is to put the knight on e4, make sence, I would do the same. Now White are dominating clearly in the center, and having some attacking chances as well, by plying Rd3 ( multifunktional idea, double the rook plus threatening to play Nf6 in a nice moment). Computer is not giving White a big advantage, but from human point of view, Blacks position is looking bad. Note: All commentary by GM Arkadij Naiditsch author of Chess Evolution material, expect videos later at the video section
16... Qc8 it is hard to say why Paco played Qc8 and not Qb7
17. Ba2 A very nice move by Aronian. White are playing for mate! Next White move is Bb1 and at g6 White has many attacking choises like: h4, or Qd2-f4, or just a simple Nd6. The clowds are getting darker over Vallejo.
17... b3 b3, a sign of disparation...pawns are equal, but that is the only thing that is equal. White position is much better. White can even go back to the plan with Ba2... also Nd6 or just Rac1 are looking very tempting...
18. Bxb3 Seems like Vallejo is having a very bad start into the tournament loosing a game almost with out fight by playing very strange 7...Qd4?!...
18... Nd7 maybe now at 19.Ba2 Black got a defence idea with Rd8 followed by Nf8, so no quick mate... but of course now after easy and logical 19.Nd6 Bxd6 20.Rxd6 Black position is looking just horrible. I don't think that in case Aronian decided to play 19.Nd6 game will last for many more moves...
19. Nd6 Yes, Aronian of course is making the right move...19.Nd6!
19... Bxd6 20. Rxd6 at 20...c5 is comming 21.Rad1, next to Ba2-b1
20... c5 21. Rad1 c4 22. Ba2 Nc5 23. Bb1 the end is comming closer...probably 23...Nd3 is the only move but after 24.b3! cb 25.Qd2! ( not 25.Qxc8? Rfc8 26.Bxd3 Bxd3 27.R6xd3 and b2 followed by Rc1) White are probably winning
23... g6 24. h4 h5 25. Qc1 Seems like Aronian does not see a clear way to victory? Is he relying on the time trouble of Vallejo?
25... Bb7 26. Nd4 And again, playing possitionally instead of going for great pressure.
26... Ne4 Vallejo finding the right move in time trouble! 10 moves for 2 minutes, can the Spaniard hold the time trouble and still come out from this difficult possition? Not likely....
27. Qh6 Nxd6 28. exd6 Qd7 29. Re1 Bd5 30. Re5 f6 31. Nxe6 Bxe6 32. Qxg6+ seen fast by a machine, but for Vallejo will require high calculation.
28. Bxg6 fxg6 29. Qxg6+ Kh8 30. Qh6+ Kg8 31. Nxe6 Nf5 32. Qg6+ Kh8 33. Qxh5+ Kg8 34. Qg6+ Kh8 35. Nxf8 Qxf8 36. Rd7 Qh6 37. Qxf5 Rf8 After a blazing "on the clock" game from the two players the smoke is going and we can see a more clear evaluation of the position. Exchanging a heavy piece now (the the queen or even both) will leave the bishop difficult to attack on pawns on the kingside.
38. Qg5 Qxg5 39. hxg5 The game is probably won for white, but not easy! Aronian is for sure not happy that he let Black escape over the time trouble, while Vallejo should be happy with finding the precise moves.
39... Be4 40. Rxa7 Rb8 The key is that there are soo many of the White pawns! But in case Black manages to exchange White a pawn for the Blacks c pawn and not let the White e pawn run into a queen the win will be not an easy one for sure.
41. f3 Bf5 42. Rc7 Be6 And just when Vallejo has enough time to find the best play he commits a mistake and now the game is lost.
43. Rc6 Bg8 44. f4 Rxb2 45. e6 Re2 46. f5 Re5 47. g4 Re4 48. Kf2 Rxg4 49. e7 Bf7 50. g6 Kg7 51. gxf7 Kxf7 52. Re6 Ke8 53. f6 With this victory Aronian takes the lead in the Grand Slam 2011. Vallejo was trying hard after the strange opening, but there is something to realize. This tournament is for 3 super chess beasts (Anand, Carlsen, and Aronian), 2 beast (Nakamura and Ivanchuk) and and just one super GM Vallejo. So for the Spaniard every point in the event will be of great importance, while the experience will be very valuable. 1-0

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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Wed Sep 28, 2011 8:05 pm

Carlsen,Magnus (2823) - Aronian,Levon (2807) [C84]
4th Final Masters Sao Paulo/Bilbao BRA/ESP (2.2), 27.09.2011

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.d3 d6 7.c3 0-0 8.Nbd2 b5 9.Bc2 d5 10.Re1 dxe4 11.dxe4 Be6

Carlsen avoids the Marshall Gambit and they play a quiet positional Ruy Lopez instead.

[11...Bc5 12.h3 Qe7 13.Nf1 Be6 14.Be3 Rad8 15.Qc1 Nh5 16.Bxc5 Qxc5 17.Qe3 1/2-1/2 Gramignani,R (2030) -Parvin,T/Yerevan ARM 1996]

12.h3 Nd7 13.Nf1 Nc5 14.Ne3 Qxd1 15.Rxd1 f6 16.Nd5 Bd6 17.Be3 Nb7 18.b4

White clearly has a little something.

18...Ne7 19.a4 c6 20.Nb6 Rab8 21.Nd2 c5 22.axb5 axb5 23.c4 cxb4 24.cxb5 Bc5 25.Bb3 Bxb3 26.Nxb3 Bxe3 27.fxe3 Na5 28.Rxa5 Rxb6 29.Rd7 Nc8
What a really interesting position. White has the easier play and surely must be slightly better but it does seem like black has sufficient play at the moment.

30.Nc5 h5 31.Rd3 Re8

Avoiding the fork on d7.

32.Na4 Rb8 33.Rb3 Nb6 34.Rxb4 Rec8 35.Nxb6 Rxb6 36.Ra6 Rc1+ 37.Kf2 Rc2+ 38.Kg3 Rxa6 39.bxa6 Ra2 40.Rb6
This is a very difficult ending.

40...Kf7

Black clearly doesn't fear allowing the pawn to get to a7.

41.Rb7+ Kg6 42.a7 Kh6 43.Kh2 g6 44.Kg1 Kg5 45.Rh7 f5 46.g3 Kf6 47.Kf1 fxe4 48.Ke1 Ke6 49.Rg7 Kd5 50.g4 hxg4 51.hxg4 Kc4 52.Rd7 g5 53.Kd1 Kc3 54.Ke1 Kc4 55.Kd1 Kc3 56.Ke1 1/2


H. Nakamura (USA) V. Anand (IND)

1. c4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5 9. Ne5 Nbd7 10. Nxc6 Qb6 11. d5 Bb7 12. a4 a6 13. Be2 Bxc6 14. dxc6 Qxc6 15. axb5 axb5 16. Rxa8+ Qxa8 17. O-O Qc6 18. e5 Nd5 19. Nxd5 Qxd5 20. Qa1 Bg7 21. Rd1 Qc5 22. Qa8+ Ke7 23. Qb7 Rd8 24. Bf3 Bxe5 25. Bxe5 Qxe5 26. Bc6 Kf6 27. Bxd7 Qxb2 28. Rf1 c3 29. Qc7 Ra8 30. Bxe6 fxe6 31. f4 Ra1 32. fxg5+ Kxg5 33. Qg7+ Kh5 34. Qf7+ Kg5 35. Qf6+ Kh5 36. Qf7+ Kg5 37. Qg7+ Kh5 38. Qf7+ ½-½



V. Ivanchuk (UKR) F. Vallejo (ESP)

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Bc5 4. e3 d6 5. Bg2 a6 6. d3 Ba7 7. Rb1 Bf5 8. b4 Qc8 9. h3 Nge7 10. Nge2 O-O 11. Qd2 h6 12. a3 Nd8 13. Bb2 f6 14. Rc1 c6 15. d4 Nf7 16. e4 Bd7 17. Nd1 f5 18. dxe5 dxe5 19. c5 Bb8 20. Ne3 fxe4 21. h4 Nd5 22. Nc3 Nxe3 23. Qxe3 a5 24. O-O axb4 25. axb4 Bh3 26. Bxh3 Qxh3 27. Nxe4 Bc7 28. Qb3 Bd8 29. Rc3 Qg4 30. f3 Qg6 31. Kh2 Kh7 32. Rd1 b6 33. Qc2 bxc5 34. Rxc5 Kh8 35. Rxc6 Qh5 36. Kg2 Bxh4 37. g4 1-0


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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Wed Sep 28, 2011 8:06 pm

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 L. Aronian 4 1
V. Ivanchuk 4 1
3 M. Carlsen 2 3
H. Nakamura 2 3
V. Anand 2 2
6 F. Vallejo 0 0

All the games in PGN: http://www.chessbase.com/news/2011/misc/games/finalmast11.pgn
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Wed Sep 28, 2011 8:56 pm

L. Aronian (ARM) VS H. Nakamura (USA)

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 c6 3. e3 Nf6 4. Nc3 g6 5. d4 Bg7 6. Bd3 Aronian-Naka starts as Slav, Slechter variation
6... O-O 7. O-O Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 e6 10. Rd1 Nbd7 11. b3 a5 12. Bf1 Qb8 13. Bd2 Rd8 14. Be1 After a positional battle began on the board, Aronian has transfereed his bishop to e1, which may look strange, but is actually a standard plan here. White bishop on e1 is better than it looks and also square c1 is now freed for white Ra1.
14... Ne8 I am ot sure that this is the best move, black main counterplay in this position is related to a e5 central pawn break-which 14...Ne8 is not helping. Naka likely wants to transfer his knight to d6, but looks a bit passive. Would expect Aronian to calmly develop with Rac1
15. Rab1 Aronian decided to place it to b1 instead of c1, also ok. Levon likely wants to play a4 with b4 to follow, open b file and get a pressure there.
15... Nd6 16. Qe2 16.Qe2 is also a standard plan. May look passive for white, but its not. Crucial for white is to stop black e5 related counterplay (which is now much under control). white would than find a way to improve his position. Would be interesting to find out whether Naka would go for a f5 idea. Black has given his light squared bishop, his pawns are on light squares, control of e4 square is desirable and f5 looks positionaly sound. Black would than has to count with white f3, e4 plan.
16... Re8 Naka wants to prepare e5 pawn break-as already mentioned,the most standard counterplay for black here, but than was knight piruette to d6 necessary?
17. Qc2 c2 is a good square for white queen here. Black e5 counterplay is not easy to manage, mainly because black d5 pawn hangs (due to the fast that knight has been transferred to d6!)
17... h5 It is not like Naka is planing a kingside mating attack, it is probably just a useful move.
18. Be2 Qd8 a logical move, since queen was not doing much on b8 at the moment. Now is interesting to find out Levons plan behind 18.Be2
19. Bf3 Ok, so, Aronian wanted to place his bishop to a long diaginal, while not willing to allow 18.g3 h4 type of play. I think that Naka would go for f5. This with Ne4 to follow makes perfect sense for black. Still I am not that fond of Be2-f3 idea. Now after f5 , Ne4-black knight would be difficult to kick out (since white f3 is no longer possible).
19... Rb8 20. Qd3 Naka wants to play b5 which is positionally sound, but why not to be agressive and go for f5.
20... Qe7 21. Qf1 Nf5 well.....my f5 with Ne4 to follow idea is not going to happen today.
22. Be2 perhaps bishop transfer to f3 was not that great after all
22... Ra8 23. Bd3 Nd6 24. Rbc1 [22:42:38] Sokolov Ivan: since white cannot roll his pawns either on the queenside or in the center it is difficult for him to improve his position here. Knowing Aronian, he may look for the good moment for c5 and than start solling his queenside pawn
24... Qd8 perhaps now 25.a3
25. Bb1 White's bishop is still looking for a perfect place
25... Bh6 26. Na4 perhaps now is finally the time for black f5. Maybe I am too much on this idea, but f5 looks good for black.
26... Bf8 Still not easy for Levon to proceed. If he is to seize the initiative he would have to roll his pawns, but I do not see how. Not a single take on the board for 26 moves!
27. Nc5 Qc7 28. Nd3 a4 28 moves without a single exchange! Now is the time for the first one
29. Nf4 axb3 30. axb3 "a" pawn swap is strategically ok for black here, since it opens the file for his rook.
30... Qd8 31. Bb4 Aronian would exchange the bishops, then he may go for b4 or perhaps e4. Anyhow definitely trade the bishops
31... Nc8 32. Bxf8 Nxf8 Now which pawn to push? e4 looks logical.
33. Bd3 White delays any pawn push
33... Ra3 Black wants to keep some activity
34. b4 Exactly, if white wants something here, he has to start advancing his pawns. White wants to proceed with b5 and cause a damage to a black queenside pawn chain.
34... Nb6 I am not sure that this stops anything. Why not continue with b5 for white?
35. b5 Qe7 black is hoping to be able to hold with a status quo moves, I am not sure about his strategy.
36. bxc6 bxc6 37. cxd5 cxd5 38. Rc6 Nbd7 Black seems to be holding, but white is better. White should open with e4 now.
39. Ra6 No e4 and that now looks like a draw.
39... Rxa6 40. Bxa6 Rb8 41. Rb1 Rxb1 42. Qxb1 Qd6 43. Be2 Qb8 44. Qxb8 Nxb8 45. Bb5 Nbd7 46. Bxd7 Nxd7 And as expected the players shake hands and go with 1 point each. ! ½-½


F. Vallejo (ESP) vs M. Carlsen (NOR)

1. Nf3 g6 Interesting start! Pirc or KID?
2. e4 Bg7 So Magnus wants Pirc or fianchetto. It is important that Paco is also 1.e4 player, so he is not confused with this stuff.
3. d4 d6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. Qe2 Usually Paco wants on 4...Nf6 to employ the e5 line and he goes for it. After O-O a good option is , 6. e5 something that Vallejo has in his arsenal.
5... O-O 6. e5 is a logical consequence of 5.Qe2 and would be strange for white now to change his mind and go for another set-up
6. O-O Still keeping the e5 possibility, probably just a transposition. Bg4 and c6 are on the list for Magnus. Anyhow black has to be ready for white's 7.e5 here.
6... Bg4 To mention as an option to e5 is 7.Nbd2 with 8.h3 to take a bishop pair is logical for white. Will Paco go for it?
7. Rd1 Keeping both options open. Paco is trying to get back in the tournament, but on the other hand 0/3 would have been a disaster, so he would likely try to play a balanced, controlled game. 7...c6 is a first hand option for black. With 7...c6 black is ready to play 8...d5, while at the same time gets this square defended as an outpost for his knight
7... Nc6 Carlsen is preparing on 8.e5, to play 8...Nd7. White can no longer play 8.Nbd2 (d4 hangs) hence white might likely play c3, a good option. Black is with his strategy fighting for d4 square, so white c3 might be logical, though black is still likely to continue with e5. Paco is thinking, not an easy decision, he understands that 8.c3 is logical, but he might not like 8...e5, since than after 9.d5 black has more or less a regular KID position, while it would take white quite some time to start a regular KID queenside pawn advance. Maybe 8.h3 taking the bishop pair, though black looks ok after 8...Bxf3 9.Qxf3 e5
8. Bb5 Attacking Nc6 and hence fighting for a d4 square
8... Nd7 Black is renewing d4 square pressure. And again on 9.c3 black is likely to play 9...e5. I think that carlsen is having a comfortable game. Maybe after a 0/2 start it is difficult for Vallejo psychologically. It might well be that Vallejo would have to go something like 9.c3 e5 10.bxc6 bxc5 11.dxe5 Nxe5 12.Nbd2 with 13.h3 to follow. Immediate 9.Bxc6 bxc6 10.h3 is not good for white, since black gets an excellent game after 10...Bxf3 11.Qxf3 c5. Carlsen is ahead in developmet and Vallejo would have to stabilize the position. At some stage he is very likely to take Bxc6 in order to minimize the dynamic element in a position.
9. c3 e5 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. h3 Bxf3 As expected Paco has exchanged black knight on c6 in order to release a central tension. I still think that 11.dxe5 with Nbd2 and h3 to follow was better option for white. Namely black can now get a good game with 12...exd4 13.cxd4 c5
12. Qxf3 Option for Carlsen to consider here is also 12...f5!? as after 13.exf5 he can proceed with 13....d5, later collecting f5 pawn and having a great game. White's main problem is that he is behind in development. Black is very comfortable. Carlsen understands perfectly well that he is very fine. He is now looking for the ways to take over.
12... exd4 So Magnus decides to open the long diagonal. Now after 13.cxd4 he would likely proceed with 13...c5
13. cxd4 c5 14.Be3 now looks like almost forced for Vallejo
14. Be3 14...Qb8 is a standard plan. 14...Rb8 is also good. Vallejo's problem after 14...Rb8 is that its difficult to defend b2.
14... Rb8 if 15.Qe2, black would hit on e4 square. 15.b3 Rb4! might go terribly wrong for white. White cannot sac b2 pawn in a clever way. 15.b3 is not an option (due to 15...Rb4), so 15.Qe2 looks forced. Nt easy for Paco, when you start 0/2 this is not kind of a game you are looking for!
15. Qe2 Now lets see how Magnus develops his initiative, white needs just one move 16.Nc3 and has completed development and is ok. Can Carlsen play 15... Rb4?! 15...Rb4 16.a3 Rxd4! with a great comp for exchange
15... Rb4 Yes he does!
16. a3 Rb3 No Rxd4.... a pitty... I am convinced that the compensation for exchange would have been great. 16...Rb3 is btw positionally very sound, white b2 pawn is now weak. I think Paco has to play 17. Nc3. 17.Nc3 Qb8 and now if 18. Rab1 cxd4 and after swapping everything on d4 white Nc3 would hang, therefore 17.Ra2
17. Ra2 This looks very unnatural for white and cannot be good.
17... Qb8 18. Qc2 Rf8 is black only unemployed piece and is likely to now get in action. Vallejo threathens to consolidate, so magnus has to be smart and has to be fast.
18... a5 Carlsen plays 18...a5 in order to protect his rook position on b3. If white now plays move like 19.Nd2 black calmly responds with 19...a4. So Vallejo would have to develop his knight to c3. Can Vallejo take dxc5?
19. dxc5 Nxc5 20.Bxc5 is to be expected. The drawback of early take of c5 for white is that black now threathens to place his bishop to d4
20. Bxc5 dxc5 21. Qxc5 Paco does not allow Bd4 plan. I am under the impression that Magnus did not take the most out of the position. Perhaps sacrificing an exchange on d4 was to be considerd after all. Black Rb3 is dominant to white passive Ra2, so Rd8 may look logical.
21... Rd8 since black rook is dominating white, Magnus would like to exchange some pieces, so this domination would be more felt
22. Nc3 Deep thought for Vallejo and not much time left. This was, however, probably the best move. Perhaps 22...Rd1 23.Nd1 Rd3. Carlsen is thinking-though difficult to come up with something else rather than 22...Rxd1.
22... Rxd1+ 23. Nxd1 Qd8 24. Ra1 24.Qd5 was an alternative
24... Qd2 black is very dominant, though not that many pieces left on the board. Not easy for Paco toentangle his pieces, perhaphs Rc1?
25. Rc1 Yes, it is played, but the computers immediatelly show it is not a good idea... apparantly Qe1 with Rd3 to follow is strong for black
25... Qe1+ 26. Kh2 now Rd3 wins material, due to a terrible position of his king, white can after Rd3 not prevent material loses. 26...Bh6 is also maybe winning
26... Qxe4 Strange, but still lot's of problems for white. A great game by Magnus untill now, amazing to see how he is finding chances to play for a win. The Rd3 missed is probably due to time trouble.
27. Qc2 Be5+ 28. g3 Black's position is still better and he should try to keep the queens on the board. Maybe now 28...Qf3 with future h5-h4. Actually the position is much more easy to play for Black than for White, Black got a clear target - White's king! Paco will have here a very hard test to survive the next 12 moves untill the time control.
28... Rd3 29. Ne3 of course White needs to get their knight finally in the game, also next move could be Qc4 in a hope for a Queen exchange. Somehow Blacks 28...Rd3 is not looking to good
29... h5 30. Nc4 Qd5 Amazing, Magnus blundered a piece?
31. Nxe5 Rd2 such mistakes we don't see very often from Carlsen...probably his bigest blunder of the 2011 year...
32. Qc5 Qxc5 White's position is totally winning
33. Rxc5 Rxf2+ 34. Kg1 Rxb2 35. Rxc7 Rb3 36. Kg2 Rxa3 37. Nxf7 a4 38. Ra7 Ra1 39. Ne5 g5 What to say.... Black played a great game, overplayed White, been very close to winning, then let White a bit of "fresh air" and blundered a full piece in one move... Very sad story for the current World Number one...
40. g4 hxg4 41. hxg4 a3 White can play now the simple Nf3-g5... seems that Black got no chances at all
42. Nf3 And the game concludes with 3 full points for Vallejo, who is now ahead of Carlsen in the table. 1-0

V. Anand (IND) vs V. Ivanchuk (UKR)
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 f5 4. d3 fxe4 5. dxe4 Nf6 6. O-O Bc5 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Bg5 d6 9. Nd5 Kh8 10. c3 Ne7 11. Nxf6 gxf6 12. Be3 Bxe3 13. fxe3 Ng6 14. Nd2 c6 15. Bd3 Be6 16. Rf2 Qb6 17. Nf1 Rf7 18. Qh5 Rg8 19. Re1 d5 20. Ng3 d4 21. exd4 exd4 22. e5 dxc3 23. Bxg6 Rxg6 24. bxc3 Bg4 25. Qh4 fxe5 26. Ne4 Be6 27. Kh1 Rxf2 28. Nxf2 Qb2 29. Rd1 Qe2 30. h3 h6 31. Kh2 Qe3 32. Rd8+ Kh7 33. Rb8 Rg7 34. Rf8 Qg5 35. Qe4+ Qg6 36. g4 Bxa2 37. Qxe5 Qe6 38. Qf4 Rf7 39. Rxf7+ Qxf7 40. Qe4+ Kg7 41. Nd3 Qc7+ 42. Ne5 Qd6 43. Kg3 a5 44. Qf4 a4 45. g5 hxg5 46. Qxg5+ Kf8 47. c4 c5 48. Qf5+ Ke7 49. Kg2 Bb3 50. Qe4 b6 51. Ng4+ Qe6 52. Qb7+ Kf8 53. Qb8+ Kg7 54. Qc7+ Kg6 55. Qf4 Bc2 56. Qh6+ Kf7 57. Qf4+ Kg7 58. Qc1 Be4+ 59. Kg3 Qd6+ 60. Kh4 Qe7+ 61. Kg3 Qd6+ 62. Kh4 Kf7 63. Qb2 Bf5 64. Qf2 Kg6 65. Qa2 Bxg4 66. hxg4 Qd8+ 67. Kg3 Qd3+ 68. Kh4 a3 69. Qa1 Kf7 0-1


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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Thu Sep 29, 2011 3:12 pm

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 V. Ivanchuk 7 6.5
2 L. Aronian 5 5.5
3 H. Nakamura 3 7
F. Vallejo 3 2
5 M. Carlsen 2 3.5
V. Anand 2 2.5


all pgn games so far: http://www.chessbase.com/espanola/games/2011/2011GrandSlamSaoPaulo.pgn
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Fri Sep 30, 2011 9:24 pm

day 4:
L. Aronian (ARM) vs V. Ivanchuk (UKR)

1. Nf3 Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the Grand Slam with me GM Arkadij Naiditsch! I have just completed my ECC game and I am happy to be joining you today, the same day we announced full and better September version of Chess Evolution, see all the info here.
1... d5 2. c4 e6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 Two leaders of the tournament are meeting. Ivanchuk doesnt go for currently very popular "Vienne" varation and is choosing a rare 4...Nbd7.
5. Bg5 Bb4 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Nd2 Seems like we will have now a clasical "Queens gambit". The current position Levon also liked to play from the Black side, so he is a big specialist in it. 7.Nd2, one of the most "critical" most in the position.
Black is taking their time, probably Ivanchuk wants to avoid "the main" and forced lines after 7...h6 8.Bh4 g5
7... c6 8. e3 Ivanchuks opening choise is, as always, quite unpredictable (we saw in the last game against Anand he played Janish Gambit), so maybe we will see something new and interesting today as well ...
8... Nf8 Here we go, as expected Ivanchuk is showing us something new...
9. Bd3 But not for Aronian, he seems to know this move, or maybe just 9.Bd3 is the most logical reaction to it. As we saw in his game against Magnus, he was bluffing a bit by playing very quickly the first 15 moves, and eventually get himself into a big trouble.
9... Be7 This is really hard to understand... normal play would be 9...Ng6. What is Ivanchuk planning to do after 10.0-0 - difficult to say.
10. Qc2 Ne6 White has two nice choices, 11.Bxf6 Bxf6 12.0-0 with the simple plan b4, a4, b5 with a slight but stable advantage; and 11.Bh4 after Which it is not that clear what actually Black wants to play, maybe 11...g6 with the idea Ng7-f5, but all seems to be quite artificial. White's position should be for sure better.
11. Bh4 g6 12. h3 A very unusual move in this kind of structures. Probably Aronian wants to avoid Blacks Ng7-Bf5 by simply playing 12...Ng7 13.g4!? 13...h5 14.g5 Nh7 15.f4 with a big advantage for White.
Original and strong play by Aronian!
12... O-O Black castles and waiting for White to do the same, before playing Ng7.
Practically saying that White's "h3" been good for nothing. We will see if White will play now the aggressive 13.g4!?
In my opinion g4 is looking like quite a nice move, following could be f4 and castle short or maybe even long. Black will probably search his chances with a play on the queen side, c5 is normally a correct reaction to White's action on the kind side.
13. Nf3 A solid move, probably still waiting for 13...Ng7 to push g4.
13... a5 14. g4 Finally we see the g4 move! White position is looking much better to me, next moves are easy, Ne5, f4 and long castle. Black needs somehow to break through with c5 to get some counter-chances.
Maybe now is the right moment, 14...c5. 15.dc Nc5 16.Nd4, of course White should be better here, but still Black is completely in the game.
14... b5 15. Ne5 Bb7 16. f4 White will probably castle short, no reason to get under the attack of the Black's pawns. The idea now is simple, to play f4-f5.
GM Kamil Miton: White took more space on the king side and is trying to press there, Ivanchuk in some moment should play c5 or b4-c5 to look for counterplay.
16... c5 GM Kamil Miton from Poland will take over the commentary from this moment on.
17. f5 cxd4 18. fxe6 dxc3 19. O-O d4 20. Nxf7 Looks like 20.Nxf7 was a big mistake, white should have played 20.exf7. Now black is taking the initiative by exploiting the weaknesses around the white king.
20... Qd5 21. Bxf6 Now 21...Qh1 22.Kf2 Qxh3 23.Ke1 cxb2 24.Qxb2 Bb4 25. Kd1-Bf3 -+ Maybe Aronian concentrated attention solely on the king side and missed check from the other flank.
Also after 23...Bxf6 black is much better.
Ivanchuk now contemplating to choose between 21...Qh1 immediately or take Bxf6 first.
21... Qh1+ 22. Kf2 Qxh3 23. Ke1 cxb2 24. Qxb2 Bb4+ 25. Kd1 25. Kd1 Bf3 26. Kc1 Rfc8 27. Kb1 Qxe4! and Be4 next -+
25... Bf3+ 26. Rxf3 Qxf3+ 27. Be2 Qxf6 28. g5 Qg7 29. Qxd4 Rxf7 Ivanchuk missed simple exchanges after 29...Bc5 or 29...Bc3 with big advantage for him. Now he is still better but not so much, and he is in time trouble.
30. exf7+ Qxf7 31. Rc1 Rb8 32. a4 Aronian had good chance to survive after the strange 29...Rxf7?, but he blunder again! 32.a4?? is a loosing move.
32... Qb3+ 33. Rc2 Qb1+ 34. Rc1 Qb3+ 35. Rc2 Rc8 36. Bc4+ bxc4 37. Qd5+ Kf8 38. Qd7 Re8 0-1

M. Carlsen (NOR) vs H. Nakamura (USA)
1. d4 Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the Grand Slam with me GM Arkadij Naiditsch! I have just completed my ECC game and I am happy to be joining you today, the same day we announced full and better September version of Chess Evolution, see all the info here.
1... d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 We have another game on a very popular Queens Gambit. Let's see which line Carlsen will choose. He really needs (and probably wants) to win today, after a very unlucky loss against Vallejo.
4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 Bxf6 Carlsen is choosing a "quiet" line. Probably his plan is just to get a normal position out of opening, nothing particularly theoretical.
7. e3 O-O 8. Rc1 c6 9. Bd3 Nd7 Dreev is a big expert in these lines, in case somebody wants to know how to play with Black.
10. O-O It is a bit strange that both players are taking their time for the first moves, till now nothing new, a well known and often played line.
Lately 10...dxc4 11.Bxc4 e5 12.d5 got into fashion.
10... dxc4 Finally we see a move, of course 10...dxc4...
11. Bxc4 e5 Now White got two choices, 12.d5 or 12.Ne4.
12. Bb3 exd4 13. exd4 Nb6 14. h3 The current position has been never played on a hight level before...Black's idea is quite simple, to exchange as many pieces as possible and make a pressure on the pawn d4. White should definitely search his chances in the dynamic play.
14... Re8 Black just wants to put the bishop on e6, after which his position should be fine.
15. Re1 Of course Carlsen is not allowing the immediate Be6 by playing 15.Re1. But to me it seems that Black should be doing fine anyway just by playing 15...Rxe1 16.Qxe1 Bf5.
15... Rxe1+ 16. Qxe1 Bf5 Naka is choosing easy and understandable moves, even for us! Smile Now Black wants to finish the development with moves like Qd7, Rd8 or maybe Qf8, Rd8 after which Black should be fine.
White needs to do something quickly. 17.Ne5 Bxe5 18.dxe5 Qe7 and position is looking pretty much equal to me.
Carlsen thinking for almost half an hour. Rarely I can remember the young chess genius having such a deep thought! Probably really hard to find any ideas for White to get an advantage here.
I think 17.Rd1 should be the right move. Let's see first where Black will develop the Queen. Probably 17...Qe7 could be the right answer, after 18.Qxe7 Bxe7 19.Ne5 Be6 the position is looking equal.
17. Ne5 Nd5 A bit unexpected, I though more easy is just to take on 17...Nxe5 18.dxe5 ( 18.Qxe5 Qd7) 18...Qe7 followed by Rd8 and position seems to fine for Black. Maybe now White can be little better after 18.Nxd5 cd and 19.Rc5 Be6 20.Qc3...Of course it is nothing special but I think there's been no need for 17...Nd5.
GM Kamil Miton: Probably after 17...Bxe5 White wanted to play 18.Qxe5, so Naka made Nd5.
18. Nxd5 cxd5 19. g4 Be6 GM Kamil Miton from Poland will take over the commentary from this moment on.
I find it hard to believe that g4 idea is dangerous for Black, for me this move weakens white king.
20. f4 Carlsen want's to press with f5, but it looks like black can stop it by 20...g6 and if 21.Nxg6 than Qb6.
After 20...g6 white can still prepare f4-f5, for example with Qf2-Rf1, but black should find some counter-play on d4-pawn and against potential weaknesses around the white king.
20... Qb6 21. Rd1 After 21.Rd1 black can equalize with 21...Bxe5, because if 22.fxe5 than it is not possible to improve the position on the king side. If 22.Qe5 than black can play simple f6-Bf7-Re8. 21.Qf2 was more interesting to keep the possibility to recapture dxe5.
21... Bxe5 22. Qxe5 Re8 23. f5 f6 24. Qf4 Bf7 25. Qf2 Qb4 Nakamura's idea is to put the queen on b4 for optimal control on the e1-square and pressure on the pawn d4. He might improve the position with a5-a4 later.
26. Kg2 Looks like a5-a4 is not a big improvement because white can play Rd2 and after a5-a4 just Bd1.
26... Re4 27. Rd2 Qd6 28. Bd1 Kf8 29. Bf3 Re7 30. Re2 Rxe2 31. Qxe2 Be8 32. Qe3 Bc6 33. a3 Qe7 34. Qc3 a6 35. b4 Probably nobody wants to offer draw first Smile
35... Ke8 36. a4 Qd7 37. a5 Qd6 38. Qc5 Qf4 39. Bxd5 Qd2+ 40. Kf3 Qd3+ 41. Kf2 Qd2+ 42. Kf3 Qd3+ 43. Kf2 ½-½


F. Vallejo (ESP) vs V. Anand (IND)

1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 g6 4. e3 Nf6 5. d4 cxd4 6. exd4 d5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 e6 9. Nxd5 exd5 10. Bb5 Bg7 11. Qa3 Qe7+ 12. Qxe7+ Kxe7 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Bf4 f6 15. Rc1 g5 16. Be3 Bd7 17. h4 h6 18. hxg5 hxg5 19. Rxh8 Rxh8 20. Kd2 Bf8 21. Ne1 Kf7 22. Nd3 Kg6 23. Nc5 Be8 24. g3 Kf5 25. Rc3 Bd6 26. Ra3 Rh7 27. Ra6 Kg4 28. Nd3 Rc7 29. b4 Bd7 30. b5 Be7 31. bxc6 Bxc6 32. Ra5 Bd8 33. Nb4 Ba8 34. Rc5 Rd7 35. a3 Bb7 36. Nd3 Ba6 37. Nb4 Bc4 38. Rc8 Be7 39. Ra8 Rb7 40. Nc6 Bxa3 41. Rxa7 Rxa7 42. Nxa7 Bb4+ 43. Kc2 Kf3 44. Nc8 Bb5 45. Kd1 Ba4+ 46. Kc1 Ke2 47. Kb2 Bd7 48. Nb6 Bc6 49. Nc8 g4 50. Kc1 Bd7 51. Nb6 Be6 52. Na4 Be1 53. Nc5 Bf5 54. Na4 Bxf2 55. Bxf2 Kxf2 56. Nc3 Be4 57. Kd2 Bf3 0-1

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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:24 pm

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 V. Ivanchuk 10 15
2 V. Anand 5 6.5
L. Aronian 5 6.5
4 H. Nakamura 4 11.5
5 M. Carlsen 3 7
F. Vallejo 3 3
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Sat Oct 01, 2011 10:24 pm

H. Nakamura (USA) vs F. Vallejo (ESP)
1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 Bc5 4. Bg2 a6 5. e3 d6 6. Nge2 Nge7 7. b3 Ba7 8. Bb2 Rb8 9. d3 Bf5 10. Qd2 Qd7 11. h3 O-O 12. f4 Be6 13. d4 Nf5 14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. O-O-O exd4 16. exd4 Ne7 17. g4 f5 18. g5 Bf7 19. Ng3 a5 20. h4 a4 21. Nxa4 Bxc4 22. bxc4 c5 23. Nc3 Rb4 24. Qd3 cxd4 25. Nb5 d5 26. Nxa7 c5 27. cxd5 Qxa7 28. a3 Rb6 29. Qc4 Nc8 30. d6+ Kh8 31. d7 Qxd7 32. Rh2 Qb7 33. Rc2 Rb5 34. Nxf5 Rxf5 35. Rxd4 Rf8 36. Rdd2 Ne7 37. h5 Nf5 38. h6 Rxb2 39. hxg7+ Kxg7 40. Qc3+ Nd4 41. Rxb2 Qd5 42. Qh3 Re8 43. Rb6 Kg8 44. Kb2 Qf7 45. Qh6 Qxf4 46. Rh2 Re7 47. g6 Qxh6 48. Rxh6 Re2+ 49. Kc3 hxg6 50. Rhxg6+ Kf7 51. Rbf6+ Ke7 52. Ra6 Ne6 53. a4 Kd7 54. a5 Nc7 55. Ra7 Re7 56. a6 Ke8 57. Rb7 Kf7 58. Rc6 Nd5+ 59. Kc4 1-0


V. Ivanchuk (UKR) vs M. Carlsen (NOR)

1. e4 Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the Grand Slam with me GM Arkadij Naiditsch! I have just completed my ECC game and I am happy to be joining you today, the same day we announced full and better September version of Chess Evolution, see all the info here.
1... e6 A surprise at the first move, Carlsen in choosing French defence, maybe for the first time in his life.
2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 I stand corrected, just remembered a great victory by Carlsen against Karjakin with Black in this opening. It seems like Carlsen is playing French when he wants to play for a win. And he really needs to! - After his horrible blunder in the game against Vallejo.
6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Be3 Be7 7....Be7 is a relatively rare move, more popular is the direct 7...Qb6.
8. a3 A nice prophylactic move, commonly useful in this structures. Often Black are trying the plan with a6-b5 and White are normally reacting to hinder the advance. But maybe now Black could try a quick,dynamic play in the center?! By making a castle and a quick f6.
8... O-O 9. Qd2 b6 This move is really a surprise! Black probably wants to develop the bishop to a6 by playing a5-Ba6. In my opinion b6 is looking a little bit too slow. Maybe White could try now to play 10.h4, which is very typical.
The idea is to make a weakness on the Blacks king side, then to castle long and launch a strong attack. Maybe that's why 9...b6 is looking a bit "too" slow.
10. g3 Ivanchuk is choosing a very solid continuation 10.g3, I would have played the more aggressive 10.h4 or 10.0-0-0. Probably from Black we can expect now 10...a5.
10... Kh8 10...Kh8 wow. What to say to this. Probably Black is preparing the f6 move, but how Kh8 would help it is not that clear. I can see only one reason in this move, in case White would play now 11.Bg2 Ba6, Carlsen is trying to say that Kh8 is more useful move than a7-a5.
It seems like Carlsen shocked Ivanchuk a bit with his 9..b6 and 10...Kh8!?. Ivanchuk is very creative player himself, but I don't think in this game he will manage to find "stranger" moves.
11. h4 Well what to say, I think 10.h4 would have made more sense. I don't think White really needs the move g3, he will most probably go anyway for long castle and g4.
But who knows, over the next few moves we will see. Till now it's been very very hard to predict the moves of both players.
11... f6 Finally something logical 11...f6! Black is trying to get some play in the center. White got a lot of possibilities, the simplest seems to be 12.exf6. It is very unclear with which piece Black wants to recapture, probably 12...Nxf6 and 12...gxf6 are the two main choices.
12. exf6 Nxf6 13. Bh3 The position remains quite sharp, now on 13.Bh3 Black could try 13...Ne4 14.Nxe4 dxe4 15.Ne5 Nd4 16.0-0-0 but probably White are doing better here.
Black quickly has to do something as White needs one more move to have a clearly better position after 0-0-0.
13... Bd7 This is a clear sign that White are doing much better. But Ivanchuk needs to take a decision, castle long or short...
14. Rd1 Ivanchuk is going for a safe 14.Rd1, that means castle short.
14... cxd4 Complication complication, now on 15.Nxd4 Magnus probably wants to play 15...e5!? with a very tricky position, for ex: 16.Nxc6 Bxc6 17.fxe5 d4 18.exf6 Bxf6 and Black should be better.
15. Nxd4 e5 16. Nxc6 Bxc6 17. fxe5 We see a very concrete play. But maybe Carlsen missed the 17...d4 18.exf6 Bxf6 19.Bg2! Bxg2 20.Qxg2 Qe8 21.Nd5 dxe3 with a very unclear position.
17... d4 18. exf6 Bxf6 19. O-O Looking like a strange decision to me. Also now we can see that his 14.Rd1 clearly wasn't the best, 14.0-0-0 should have been the correct choice.
19... dxc3 Probably White should take 20.Qxd8 Rxad8 21.bxc3 Bxc3 and Black are doing little better. 20.bxc3 is looking very dangerous because of 20...Qe7.
20. Qxd8 Raxd8 21. Rxd8 Rxd8 22. b3 Now if 22....Be4 23.Bf5 and White can even be better in the future.
22... Re8 22...Re8! setting a small trap. If now 23.Re1? Bd4! 24.Kf2 Rxe3! 25.Rxe3 Be4! and the pawn c2 is falling. Probably 23.Bg5 should lead to a draw.
23. Bf2 A nice and solid move, probably after the next 24.Re1 the game should head into a draw.
23... Be4 24. Re1 Re7 25. Rc1 So Black managed to drive rook to c1, actually first I though that White could play 25.Re2 but of course after 25...Bg6 White is simply losing the pawn on c2.
Now Black position is looking much better, Rc1 is super passive, Black only needs to somehow bring the rook to the second rank, after which the game would be over. But maybe makes sense to first play a few prophylactic moves like 25...h6 and Kh7, and afterwards to try something more active. It is quite unclear how White will bring the rook back to life.
25... h5 26. Bg2 Bf5 27. Bf3 g6 Maybe Black can try this plan: Kh7, Bg7-h6, not that easy for White to do something against it.
28. a4 Kh7 29. b4 Ivanchuk is trying to create sort of "counterplay" or at least to do something...can Black play now 29...Rd7 30.Rd1 Rd2? Looking almost winning to me...
29... g5 30. a5 g4 Pretty idea by Carlsen, g5-g4, but was it really needed?! Anyway White's position is getting worse and worse. Very unusual chess we are following in Sao Paolo. The one who is better after the opening is mainly loosing.
31. axb6 axb6 32. Bc6 Re2 33. Bxb6 Be5 34. b5 Kg7 Something very strange is going on here, all moves are completely unpredictable... Let's sit and watch, I guess Carlsen should win, his position is looking too much dominant.
35. Ba5 Rxc2 36. Rxc2 Bxc2 37. Kf2 37...Ba4 is looking winning...how to stop c2, Bb2 ...??
Actually, White can play 37...Ba4 38.Bb4! c2 39.Ba3 and it seems he holds the pawn somehow...
37... Bd3 38. Ke3 Bg6 Why only Magnus played 34...Kg7?! - he would have had the Bg7-h6 idea.
39. Be4 c2 40. Bd2 Amazing inventive play by White in what it seems like almost lost position.
40... Bxg3 Interesting position now after 41.Bxg6 Kxg6 42.Kd3 Bxh4 43.Kxc2 Bd8 44.Kd3 h4 45.Ke2 h3 46.Kf2, and probably Black is winning, but he will have to work a bit for the full point...
41. Bxg6 Kxg6 42. Kd3 Bf2 Great move my Carlsen 42...Bf2! The King is going to h3.
43. Kxc2 g3 44. Bf4 g2 45. Bh2 Kf5 0-1




V. Anand (IND) vs L. Aronian (ARM)

1. e4 Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the Grand Slam with me GM Arkadij Naiditsch! I have just completed my ECC game and I am happy to be joining you today, the same day we announced full and better September version of Chess Evolution, see all the info here.
1... e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 Anand is choosing (same as Carlsen in several games) anti Marshall with d3.
6... b5 This time Aronian is playing a different line than few days ago, actually the "b5" line is of course the main in the "anti Marshall".
7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 b4 9. Nbd2 Na5 10. Ba2 c5 11. c3 Up to now everything is well known and often played. Normal move is 11...bc and also move like 11...Rb8 is very solid.
11... Rb8 White's next move could be 12.Nc4 or 12.d4.
12. Nc4 Probably 12...0-0 or 12...Nc4 should be the two main options. On 12...0-0 White maybe could try 13.cxb4!?. White should definitely search for a play on the queen side, and do it quite quick. In case Black manages to develop the pieces White will have no advantage.
I think Black should take on c4, 12...Nc6 is looking not good because of 13.Ne3 and we have a typical anti Marshall position where White saved at least a tempo by not playing Re1.
12... O-O Maybe Anand could try now to make use of a bit weakened white squares by playing Nfd2!?
13. Nxa5 Qxa5 14. Bd2 White is choosing the simpler play. Probably Black needs to take on 14...bxc3 15.Bxc3 (15.bxc3 also possible, but I think after 15...Bd7 16.Bc4 h6 Black should be more or less OK, maybe just little worse.) 15...Qc7 16.Nd2 and I think White are doing better.
Maybe Black could try 14...Bd7, but I think after 15.cxb4 cxb4 16.Bc4 followed by Qb3 and White should be better.
14... bxc3 15. Bxc3 It seems that Anand managed to get some advantage after the opening. As we all know, Aronian is the biggest Marshall expert in the world. Maybe he still needs to do some work on anti-Marshall with d3.
15... Qd8 Why not 15...Qc7, it's not easy to understand. I guess White play should be consistent, 16.Nd2.
16. Nd2 Be6 I think that White are having a slight advantage after 17.Nc4, with the idea to play Qd2, Rfc1 and b4.
17. Nc4 Qc8 18. Qf3 This is very hard to understand...why White doesn't want to play Qd2, Rfc1 and b4, it is looking very logical and in my opinion should also bring some advantage.
18... Bg4 19. Qe3 Be6 20. Qe2 No repetition, uff, today we are lucky. Why 20.Qe2 - I think White has the following plan for the future: Rfc1, Ne3, Rab1 and maybe b4.
20... Rd8 21. a5 A logical move, now Black needs to decide, to let White's knight settle on b6, or to stop him by playing 21...Nd7, which is looking like quite a passive move to me. But on 21...Qc6 22.Nb6 Bxa2 23.Rxa2 Qb5 24.Rc1 and I think White should be doing little better.
21... Qc6 22. Nb6 Rb7 Probably Aronian is trying to prepare the d5 breakthrough. Difficult to find any other reason in this move. Right now after 22...d5? 23.Bxe5 and rook on b8 is under attack.
Maybe White could play 23.Rfe1, preventing the Blacks d5, ex: 23...d5? 24.exd5 Nxd5 25.Nxd5 Bxd5 26.Qxe5 Bf6 27.Bxd5 Rxd5 28.Qe8 with mate. Also 23.Rfe1 is preparing White's Bc4, as the pawn on e4 will be protected.
23. Bxe6 A bit strange decision by White. Now the d5 square is protected and is quite unclear what should be the White's plan.
23... fxe6 24. Rac1 I think now on 24.Rac1 Qe8 black Queen is going to g6, after that Black can play Nd7 and position should be close to equal.
Maybe Black is afraid of the idea 24...Qe8 25.b4 cxb4 26.Bxb4 followed by Qa2, but hard to imagine that White will have realistic chances of winning, even if his position of course is pleasant.
24... Qe8 25. b4 cxb4 26. Bxb4 Everything more or less as expected. White is having a mini advantage, but nothing special.
26... d5 I think best chance now is to play: 27.Bc3 trying to provoke d4 and 28.Bd2, White should be better. In case of bishop exchange 27.Bxe7 Qxe7 I don't see real chances for White to win today.
27. Bc3 Bd6 28. f4 A strong move by Anand. Did Black blunder it? After 28....dxe4 29.dxe4 exf4 30.e5 Bc5 31.Kh1 Nd5 32.Qxa6 and White should be better.
28... dxe4 29. fxe5 exd3 30. Qe3 Time trouble is approaching, but it seems that White got everything under control. Now if 30...Ng4 31.Qe4 and rook on b7 and knight on g4 are hanging...
30... Nd5 31. Nxd5 exd5 32. Qxd3 Bc5+ Black found a very nice idea, 30...Nd5 and now 32...Bc5+ with the idea 33.Kh1 d4 and Qb5, so White is obliged to play 33.Bd4.
33. Bd4 Qb5 34. Rc3 Qxd3 35. Rxd3 Bxd4+ 36. Rxd4 Rb5 37. Rc1 Rxa5 38. e6 Rb5 39. Rc6 a5 40. h3 h6 41. Ra6 Rb7 ½-½



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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:10 pm

F. Vallejo (ESP) vs L. Aronian (ARM)

1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 c5 3. c4 dxc4 4. e4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 Bd7 6. Bxc4 Nc6 7. Qe3 e6 8. O-O Qb8 9. b3 Ne5 10. Bb2 Bd6 11. Nbd2 Nf6 12. Qg5 Ng6 13. Bxf6 h6 14. Qa5 Bc7 15. Qc5 Bd6 16. Qa5 Bc7 17. Qh5 gxf6 18. Bb5 Bxb5 19. Qxb5+ Kf8 20. Rad1 Kg7 21. Nc4 h5 22. Rd7 a6 23. Qb4 b5 24. Nd6 Bxd6 25. Rxd6 Qc7 26. Rfd1 Rad8 27. g3 h4 28. Rxd8 Rxd8 29. Rxd8 Qxd8 30. Qd4 Qc8 31. Nxh4 Nxh4 32. gxh4 Qc2 33. e5 fxe5 34. Qxe5+ Kh7 35. Qh5+ Kg7 36. Qg5+ Kh7 37. Qh5+ Kg7 38. Qg5+ Kh7 39. Qh5+ ½-½


M. Carlsen (NOR) vs V. Anand (IND)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 And we are off to a interesting Nimzo Indian start! It has been widely analysed in the previous competitions on Chessdom video section
4. Nf3 b6 5. Qc2 Queen is best placed on c2, just as explained by GM Henrik Danielsen here
5... Bb7 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 O-O 8. Bg5 Magnus put the bishop on g5 because the plan with b4-Bb2 compared to the line 1.d4-Nf6 2.c4-e6 3. Nf3-Bb 4.Nbd2 is with tempo less for white, also other plan is by g3-Bg2
8... d6 9. Nd2 White is going to play e4 and take control in center, so black probably will try avoid this by move c5. Usually in these structures the main task of white is to reduce black bishop on b7 after f3 move its also typical when white bishop is on b2.
9... Nbd7 10. f3 h6 11. Bh4 Following the well known theory, explained here in a concise way. White has advantage of two bishops, but black has better developed pieces, so black should try create as soon as possible some contrplay by center (by c5 and d5 )
11... Rc8 Note the interesting earlier white knight jump Nb1-f3-d2, this was all provoked to avoid the Karpov invented ...Ba6
12. e4 c5 13. Bd3 Usually very good for white is to play d5 to close bishop on b7 but in this position is not possible because 13...,exd5 14cxd5,Nxe4!
13... d5
14. exd5 Instead the 13...d5 move, I checked an interesting idea 13...Nxe4 14Bxd8 (14Bxe4 Qxh4 15. g3 Qf6 16. Bxb7 cxd4 17. Qc2 Rc7 and d5 next with compensation for piece)14...Nxc3 15. Be7 Rfe8 16. Bxd6 Na4 17. Bc2 (17b3 Nc3 and the knight on c3 is safe and position is around equal) Nxc4 18Nxc4 cxd4 with unclear position.
14... exd5 15. O-O dxc4 16. Bxc4 cxd4 17. Qxd4 Nc5 White has advantage of two bishops, black knights do not have any potential good squares in the center, the bishop on b7 is reduced by f3, but black at the same time does not have any weekness. Also after Nc5 move white probably has to exchange on f6.
18. Bxf6 Qxf6 19. Qxf6 gxf6 20. Rfd1 The position is around equal because the double pawns on black king side don't make black's position worse, maybe white should try somehow transfer the knight to f5 square. Magnus probably wants to improve his knight Nf1-Ng3 or Nf1-Ne3-Kf2
20... Na4 Correct move, black does not allow white to improve pieces. Now white has to play 21. Rab1, some trick with 21. Bb5 with idea catch knight on b2 will not work
21. Rab1 In my opinion after 21...Rfd8 Anand should have an easy draw because it is hard to imrpove the knight from d2, just no time for maneuvre Nf1-Ne3 or Ng3
21... Rfd8 To solve the problem with b2 pawn, white has lose time again like 22. Bb3 Nc5 23. Ba2 then black for example can play 23...Bd5 with equal game.
22. Bb5 Interesting move, Magnus provokes 24...Rc2 then after 25. Ne4 he can get some initiative, but looks that 24...Bc6 is the best for black and after 25. Ba6 Rc7 the black knight still presses white pawn on b2
22... Bc6 23. Be2 Magnus played 25. Be2 because he prepares the move Nc4 or Nf1, so he needs Bxd1 after exchanging the rooks on d1.
23... Bd5 Anand plays very logical, he improves his bishops on the diagonal a2-g8 and he will have some moves like Ba2 (press pawn b2) or Be6 control f5 square or also Bb3 with idea fighting for d line
24. Nf1 Be6 the bishop on e6 is much stronger than on b7.
25. Ne3 We saw a very good example of how not allow to consolidate and develop initiative, moves Na4 for pressuring b2 pawn and Bd5 for improving the bishop were very accurate and logical, as in other case white could get some slightly better position.
25... f5 Probably Anand could play 27...Ba2, but maybe he is afraid of some ideas with sacrifice of pawn b2, the move makes black squares a bit weaker, but Anand plays very practical and he wants improve the king and put it on f6.
26. g3 Kg7 27. Kf2 Kf6 White needs to take away the knight from a4, now Magnus can try 30. Ba6 and after Rb8 31. Bb5
28. Ba6 Rb8 29. b4 30. Ba6 Rb8 31. Bb5 Bb3 32. Bxa4 Bxa4 33. Nd5 Kg7 34. b3 Bd7 and white has has better structure on king side, but its hard to exploit it when black set up Kf6-Be6 and black is also looking for contreplay on queen side.
29... Nc3 30. Rxd8 Rxd8 31. Rc1 Nd5 32. Rd1 Rd7 33. Nxd5 Rxd5 34. Rxd5 Bxd5 35. Ke3 Ke5 and bishop endgame is drawish because only one weeknes on f5 is not enough to win the game,or 32. Nxd5 Rxd5 33. Rc7 Rd7
32. Ng2 Magnues played 32. Ng2 for keep more material on the board but looks that black position is safe and game should finish draw
32... Rd7 33. Rc2 Rc7 The style of Anand is very simple, just quick and very practical
34. Ne3 Rxc2+ 35. Nxc2 f4 The position is totally equal, Anand played good f4 and solve problem of potentail weak pawn f5
36. Nd4 Bd7 37. Ke2 Instead of 37. Ke2 if white played 37. Nb5 idea after 37...Bxb5 38. Bxb5 is to get position bishop against knight because usually the bishop is better when pawns are on both sides, but probably Anand had some quick conterplay Ke5-Kd4-Kc3 and pressing white pawns on queen side
37... fxg3 38. hxg3 Ne7 39. Ke3 After 39...Nf5 is draw because white king should not come for a7 pawn
39... Nf5+ 40. Nxf5 Kxf5 41. Kd4 Ke6 42. Bc4+ Ke7 43. f4 f6 44. Bd5 Kd6 45. Bf3 Be6 46. Ba8 Bf5 47. Bf3 Be6 48. Ba8 Bf5 49. Bf3 After some shuffling due to the Sofia rules a draw was agreed.
49... Be6 ½-½


V. Ivanchuk (UKR) vs H. Nakamura (USA)


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Bd3 Nf6 7. f4 Bb4 8. Nb3 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 d6 10. Ba3 O-O 11. Qd2 Rd8 12. O-O Nc6 13. Rf3 b5 14. Rg3 Kh8 15. Rf1 Bb7 16. f5 Rg8 17. Qg5 e5 18. Qh4 Ne7 19. Rh3 d5 20. Nc5 dxe4 21. Bxe4 Bd5 22. g4 h6 23. g5 Nh7 24. f6 Ng6 25. fxg7+ Rxg7 26. Qxh6 Rd8 27. Bxg6 fxg6 28. Rf6 Qc8 29. Rh4 Bf7 30. Nd3 Kg8 31. Bd6 e4 32. Be5 Rd5 33. Rc6 Qf8 34. Bxg7 Qxg7 35. Rxe4 Rxg5+ 36. Qxg5 Nxg5 37. Rc8+ Be8 38. Rcxe8+ Kh7 39. Rh4+ 1-0


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All games in PGN: http://www.chessbase.com/news/2011/misc/games/finalmast11.pgn
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Thu Oct 06, 2011 8:11 pm

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 V. Ivanchuk 13 28.5
2 M. Carlsen 7 27
H. Nakamura 7 21
V. Anand 7 18
L. Aronian 7 16.5
6 F. Vallejo 4 10.5
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:46 pm

F. Vallejo (ESP) vs V. Ivanchuk (UKR)

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. h4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 h6 7. e4 Bg7 8. d4 c5 9. Bb5+ Nc6 10. d5 Qa5 11. Rb1 a6 12. Bxc6+ bxc6 13. O-O Bg4 14. d6 Rd8 15. Bf4 exd6 16. Bxd6 Bf8 17. e5 Bxd6 18. exd6 O-O 19. Qd2 Bxf3 20. gxf3 Rd7 21. Rfd1 Rfd8 22. Qxh6 Qxc3 23. Qf4 c4 24. h5 Qg7 25. Rb6 Rc8 26. h6 Qc3 27. Rd4 Qe1+ 28. Kg2 Qe6 29. Rxa6 c3 30. Ra3 Rcd8 31. Rxc3 Rxd6 32. Rxd6 Qxd6 33. Qxd6 Rxd6 34. a4 Kh7 35. a5 Kxh6 36. a6 c5 37. Ra3 Rd8 38. f4 Kg7 39. Kf3 Kf6 40. a7 Ra8 41. Ke4 Ke6 42. Ra6+ Kd7 43. Kd5 Kc7 44. Kxc5 Kb7 45. Kb5 Rxa7 46. Rxa7+ Kxa7 47. Kc6 1-0



L. Aronian (ARM) vs M. Carlsen (NOR)

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 Be7 We are heading into a classical orthodox Queen's Gambit, very fashionable those days.
5. Bg5 O-O 6. e3 h6 7. Bxf6 Bxf6 8. Rc1 c6
9. h4 A very rare move at Grandmaster level! I only have one game in my database with this move, Botvinnik in 1944!! The idea is clearly to try to play g4 quickly. The last time Aronian played this opening, he played with Bh4 but he also played with h4 at very early stage. Good news for us, it's gonna be sharp play today! Most logical for black is to play Nd7 in order to prepare e5. Attack on the flank, react in the center. For sure, Carlsen will think for a while. He should be a little afraid of Aronian's preparation! @JonathanRosenthal: He played against Sasikiran but with Bh4... Ne4 Bxe7 etc...
9... c5 Carlsen prefers not to wait and try to open the position as quick as possible. Now we will se how deep is Aronian's preparation is because c5 isn't first choices of computers.
10. dxc5 Na6 Carlsen seems to be confident and played quickly Na6. After 11.cxd5 Nxc5 black will have enough compensation if white grabs the e6's pawn after 12...Bxe6. After 11...Nxc5 I think d6 is also a mistake because after Qb6 following by Rd8 black has the initiative. 12.Qd2 seems more logical. The idea of Qd2 is to play b4 because if 12.b4 Bxc3 13.Rxc3 Ne4 then exd5. It is difficult to see something else than 11.Qd2. Maybe 11.g4, but after Nxc5 12.g5 Bxc3 13 Rxc3 Ne4 then h5 I'm not sure who is playing for an advantage
11. cxd5 Nxc5 After 12.Qd2, black has the choice. To take back directly the pawn with 12...Bxc3 13.Qxc3 Ne4 but after 14.Qc7 I think the endgame is stigtly better for white. I prefer trying to keep the tension but how?
12. Bc4 12.Bc4, interesting. I didn't like first this move because I though black will have enough compensation after exd5 13.Qxd5 Qa5. Maybe 13.Bxd5. If 13.Nxd5 Bxb2 14.Rc2 then b5 is interesting (even 14...Ba3 is possible). After 13.Bxd5 Bf5 is strong, the d3 square is weak.
12... exd5 13. Nxd5 Bxb2 I really think Carlsen reacts perflectly after Aronian interesting h4. now the position is very unclear but it's difficult to see the point of h4 now
14. Rc2 After 14.Rc2 Ba3 maybe white can simple play 15.O-O with the idea after Bf5 to give the exchange with Nd4 in order to have good compensation with Nf5 and the Ba3 which is out of play. So now black has the choice between b5 then Ba3 or Ba3 first. I think after 14...b5 15.Be2 (not 15.Bxb5 Qa5 better for black) Ba3 16.Be6 the position is about equal. ...Ba3 I prefer 15.O-O because after 15.Rc3 black can try to play for win with b5! because after 16.Be6 Be6 black is better and after 16.Bxb5 Qa5 17.O-O Bb7 black has the initiative
14... b5 after 15.Bxb5?! Qa5+ 16.Qd2 Qxb5 17.Nc7 Qc6 18.Nxa8 Ba6 black is clearly better. So 15.Be2 or Bb3. Anyway black has to play Ba3 after. Black has the pleasant choice to develop the Bc8 : on b7, e6 or f5. After 15.Be2, Na4 is also come in consideration then a6 to protect the b5 pawn then Bb7. I think black has no problem here.
15. Be2 Na4 now 16.O-O is the most logical but 16.Qd3 is also interesting threatening Qxb5 but maybe Ng5 with a direct attack! After 16.Qd3 I prefer Be6 than a6. 17.Qxb5 Qxd5 18.Qxa4 Bd7 then Tb8 or Tc8 with good compensation for the pawn. If 17.Nc7 Rc8 18.Nxe6 Qxd3 19.Bxd3 fxe6 I think the position is balanced. After 16.O-O a6 17.Qd3 Bb7 18.Rd1 and after massive exchange I think the position is a draw... White can try 17.Nd4 but it's more complicated because 17...Qxd5 is possible and also 17...Qxh4
16. Rc7 A surprise for me! Even if I saw a computer suggest this, to me it looks suspicious. Of course the main reply is 16.Be6. So after 17.Ne7 Kh8 white has the choice between 18.Qxd8 or 18.Qc2. After 18.Qc2 only move is Bc3+ 19 Rxc3 Qa5 and now after 20.Nd4 or 20.Ng5 the line is the same : 20...Qxc3 21.Qxc3 22.Nxe6 fxe6 23 Ng6+ Kg8 24.Nxf8 Rxf8. How to judge this position? Seems to me black is slighly better. After 18.Qxd8 Rfd8 19.Bxb5 (if 19.Ng8 Bc3+ 20.Rf1 Bxa2 white is in trouble). 19...Bc3+ (if 19...Nc3 20.Be2 Bxa2 21.Nc6 Rac8 Rxc8 23.Nfd4 I think white can hold) 20.Ke2 Ba5 the position is very complicated, and also very concrete. Computer think white has to give the exchange with 21.Rhc1...
16... Be6 17. Ne7+ Kh8 18. Qc2 as I said, now Bc3 is the only move. I though and I still think the line I gave was more or less forced and the endgame resulting is better for black...
18... Bc3+ 19. Rxc3 here 19...Qe7 is also possible but looks not so strong. 19...Qe7 20.Ng5 g6 21.Nxe6 now the best is Qb4! but after 22.Nxf8 Rxf8 23.0-0 the position is equal. So I repeat the main line is 19...Qa5! 20.Ng5 (or 20.Nd4) Qxc3 21 Qxc3 Nxc3 22Nxe6 fxe6 23.Ng6 Kg8 24.Nxf8 Rxf8. I think black has the best perspective because the Be2 doesn't have good squares, the a2 pawn is weaker than the e6 (for example), and the black rook can come in the play more easily than the white.
19... Qa5 20. Ng5 Qxc3+ We are heading to the type of endgame, just as I explained above.
21. Qxc3 Nxc3 22. Nxe6 fxe6 23. Ng6+ Kg8 The game is far from finished, but we can say that Aronian didn't play well this middlegame. I don't like 16.Rc7 and also 12.Bc4. For the theory of the opening I think 12.Qd2 deserves some attention. Once again Magnus show how strong he is! So what can we say more about this endgame? Maybe time trouble can play a role now...
24. Nxf8 Rxf8 25. Bg4 now 25...Kf7, logical to bring the king in the center and to protect the e6 pawn. The question for white is how to bring the Rh1 in the game! After 25...Kf7 26.Kd2 seems good with the idea 26...Ne4 27.Ke2 and then Bf3 or Rc1. So maybe 25...e5 to prevent Kd2 is not so bad (because of the f2 pawn)
25... e5 Magnus opted for 25...e5, it looks the best because after 25... Kf7 26.Kd2 Ne4 Ke2 Rc8 Bf3 Rc2 Kd3 Nxf2 Kxc2 Nxh1 white has compensation with Kc3 following by Kb4 or Kd4. Now 30.Rf1 is possible even if it looks ugly. I don't like O-O because the king is better in the center. Rh3 with the idea Rf3 is possible but looks strange
26. O-O I still do not like this move. 26...a5 then b4 looks normal to me. 26.Be6+ was also possible to take away the king from the center but after black will win a tempo with Rf6
26... b4 It was better to play 26...a5 before b4 because now after 27.a3 a5 28.axb4 axb4 white can take the a file with 29.Ra1
27. a3 Correct move by Aronian! I really don't like 26...b4?! Anyway, maybe the advantage was not enough to pretend for more. Draw seems to be the logical outcome.
27... Rb8 28. axb4 Rxb4 29. Rc1 Rb1 Magnus is a real fighter, it was possible to play 29...Rxg4 and to offer a draw but he prefered 29...Rb1
30. Rxb1 Nxb1 31. Kf1 Nc3 32. Ke1 Kf7 33. Bf5 Nb5 34. Kd2 Nd6 35. Bc2 the endgame seems to be draw. If the bishop stay on the diagonal h3-c8 Ne4+ is possible and if not, black can bring the king in the center with Ke6
35... Ke6
36. Bb3+ Kf5 37. f3 Kf6 38. g4 g5 39. hxg5+ hxg5 40. Kc3 a5 41. Bc2 Ke6 42. Bb3+ Ke7 43. Bc2 Kd7 44. Bd1 Kc6 45. f4 Kc5 46. fxg5 Ne4+ 47. Kb3 Nxg5 48. Ka4 Kc4 49. Bc2 Kc3 50. Bf5 e4 And a draw was reached. Very interesting game today. Unfortunately it was just a draw... Aronian surprised Carlsen with a very early 9.h4... Magnus reacts with the very strong 9...c5 then, he was ready to give a pawn to have the initiative. I think 12.Bc4 was not the best. After it Magnus seized the initiative... In the endgame I think 26...b4 was not the most precise and after the strong 27.a3 draw was the logical outcome. ½-½


V. Anand (IND) vs H. Nakamura (USA)


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 Ke8 10. h3 h5 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 Rh6 14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 16. h4 f6 17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 19. f3 Rd8 20. Rxd8+ Kxd8 21. Kf2 Nf5 22. Rh1 Ng7 23. Bd2 Bf5 24. Nd1 Bxc2 25. Ne3 Bd3 26. Ng2 Ne6 27. Rxh5 Rg7 28. Bc3 Ke7 29. Rh6 Rf7 30. g4 Bb1 31. a3 f5 32. g5 Nxg5 33. Nf4 Ke8 34. Rg6 Nh7 35. Rg8+ Rf8 36. Rg7 Rf7 ½-½


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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:48 pm

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 V. Ivanchuk 13 35
2 M. Carlsen 8 33
H. Nakamura 8 29.5
V. Anand 8 27
L. Aronian 8 26.5
6 F. Vallejo 7 25


games in PGN: http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/assets/files/pgn/finalmast11_7.pgn

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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Sat Oct 08, 2011 7:53 pm

H. Nakamura (USA) vs L. Aronian (ARM)


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bf4 c6 6. e3 Bf5 7. g4 Be6 8. h4 Nd7 9. h5 Nh6 10. Be2 Nb6 11. Nh3 g5 12. hxg6 hxg6 13. Bg3 Qd7 14. Nf4 O-O-O 15. Nxe6 Qxe6 16. Rg1 Bd6 17. Qc2 Bxg3 18. Rxg3 f5 19. O-O-O Nxg4 20. Bxg4 fxg4 21. Rdg1 Rh4 22. Qe2 Rf8 23. Nd1 Rf4 24. Kd2 Nc4+ 25. Ke1 Rf3 26. Rxf3 gxf3 27. Qxf3 Qf5 28. Qg3 Rh6 29. b3 Nb6 30. Qg4 Nd7 31. Qxf5 gxf5 32. Nc3 Nf6 33. Ne2 Ng4 34. Nf4 Rh2 35. Nd3 Kd8 36. b4 Ke7 37. a4 b6 38. Ke2 Kd6 39. Kf3 a5 40. bxa5 bxa5 41. Kg3 Kc7 42. Rc1 Rh7 43. Kf4 Re7 44. Rc2 Re4+ 45. Kg5 Re8 46. Rb2 Rf8 47. Nc5 Kc8 48. Kf4 Rh8 49. f3 Nh2 50. Rf2 Rh3 51. Nb3 Kc7 52. Nxa5 Kb6 53. Nb3 Ka6 54. Nc1 Ka5 55. Ne2 Kxa4 56. Ng1 Rh6 57. Kg3 Ng4 58. fxg4 fxg4 59. Rf5 Rh1 60. Kg2 Rh4 61. Ne2 Kb5 62. Nf4 Rh8 63. Kg3 Rg8 64. Re5 Kc4 65. Re6 Kb5 66. Re7 Kb4 67. Nd3+ Kc3 68. Ne5 c5 69. dxc5 d4 70. exd4 Kxd4 71. Nd7 Rd8 72. c6 Rc8 73. Re6 Rc7 74. Rd6+ Kc4 75. Kxg4 Kb5 76. Ne5 Rh7 77. Rd7 Rh8 78. Kf5 Kb6 79. Ke6 1-0


M. Carlsen (NOR) vs F. Vallejo (ESP)

1. d4 d5 today Carlsen needs to win- no other choise in case he still wants to fight for the victory in the tournament. On the other hand Vallejo is on the raise after defeating Ivanchuk yesterday.
2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 Bf5 we can see a popular line of the Slav with 4...Bf5. Interesting that Vallejo is changing opening every game he plays...
5. Nc3 e6 6. Nh4 Be4 Still theory, who is going to throw the novelty today on the board?
7. f3 Bg6 8. Qb3 Qb6 Black also had the option of 8...Qc7, which is the more popular choice. Sakaev is one of the biggest experts in Slav with both colours, in his game lately he played now 9.Nxg6 hxg6 10.Kf2 with a slighly better position for White because of the bishop pair. Probably thats today Blacks strategy, to play something super solid.
9. Nxg6 hxg6 we will see how successfull Paco will be today, normally Paco is much stronger in "crazy positions" than in a slightly worse which he needs to defend all game long-position that we have now
10. Bd2 second main move after 10.Kf2. Now White are going for long castle
10... Bd6 10...Bd6 very quickly played by Vallejo-which is almost a novelty. More often is played 10...Nbd7 11.0-0-0 Bd6 12.h3 Qxb3 13.axb3 Nh5 with a slightly better endgame for White. Let's see what is Vallejo's idea of early Bd6 is - probably just a transposition of moves, because hard to find a better place for a knight than on d7
11. h3 now 11...Bg3 seems to be quite a bad move, White just can play 12.Kd1-c2 where the king will be placed perfectly. Maybe actually 10...Bd6 gives now White an extra option. For example at 11...Nbd7 12.c5!? is maybe possible, 12...Qxb3 13.axb3 Bg3 14.Kd1 a6 ( White wanted to play b4-b5) 15.f4!? an interesting position. To me it seems that White should do better. A little strange that Black played so quickly 10...Bd6 and at only possibility of White 11.h3 started to thiink. Maybe Black mixed the move order!? I can find no reason why Black should give this extra possibility for White to play the c5 move
11... Nbd7 Let's see now if Carlsen will come back to the main line after 12.O-O-O or play the interesting 12.c5
12. O-O-O Back to main line. The basic game of current position is Lautier-Fressinet, where Black continued: 12...O-O-O 13.Qc2 Qc7 14.Rc1 dxc4 15.Bxc4 Nb6 16.Bb3 e5 with an unclear play. 12...Qxb3 13.axb3 Nh5 14.Bd3 leads to a little better endgame for White... Actually after 12...O-O-O 13.Qxb6 is looking logical to me, 13...axb6 14.cxd5! exd5 15.Bd3 or 15.g4 and I think White's position should be a little more pleasent.
12... Qxb3 13. axb3 So we have an endgame. I think Carlsen is very happy now with his position. Endgame is definetly not Vallejo strongest point, White got bishop pair and the game going to be "slow and long" an exellent starting position for overplaying the oponent - from White point of view... Whtie's main idea is clear, to bring the central pawn in movement, opening the position where the bishop pair would dominate over the knight+bishop. So White next moves could be or e4 or g4 with the idea Bg2 and then e4 or f4. On the other hand, Black should try to play themselves c5 or e5 in a good moment. Maybe now 13...Nh5 14.Bd3 Ng3 15.Rhe1 and f5 is playable - even though Black's position is clearly worse.
13... a6 Vallejo is playing the save 13...a6 a solid waiting move
14. Kc2 And Carlsen is replying with 14.Kc2-a solid waiting move as well Smile Personally I think I would have choosen the 14.g4. But anyway, White are clearly having a better endgame. During next moves we will see which plan Carlsen will choose to improove his position
14... Nh5 The lack of g4 as suggested, is used by Vallejo for Nh5.
15. Bd3 Ng3 16. Rhe1 in my opinion Black should maybe try to caste long, 16...0-0-0, to hold the kind on e8 forever in defenetly not an option... also 16...Kf8 is a possibility, but I think 16...O-O-O is looking somehow nicer...
16... O-O-O White threat is clear, 17. e4. Maybe Black could just take 17...dxe4 18.fxe4 and e5! seems like Black would do fine... So maybe White wants to prepare first the e4 idea by playing 17.c5 then b4 and only then e4... so Black has now sort of "half a free " tempo to improve their position.
17. e4 dxe4 18. fxe4 c5 Vallejo had to take a desicion, to play 18...c5 or 18...e5, a hard choise to make, both moves seem to give Black almost equality.
19. d5 Rde8 very safe move, Black just wants to play now Ne5 and take away the bishop on d3 after which position shoud be equal. Not easy to make a suggestion for White...I think the move 17.e4 was made too early...seems like Black managed now to equalize
20. Na2 inventive play by Magnus. White are trying to create "any kind of threats". White wants to play now b4, which of course is not a dangerous move, but is at least something... maybe Black can play now 20...exd5 21.exd5 ( 21.cxd5 b5! and Black are doing very good ) 21...Nf5 and positino is looking very much equal to me
20... exd5 21. exd5 Nf5 Black is following the advices from chessdom Smile. Situation is looking brighty and brighty for Black in my opinion. I think position of Black should be objectivly equal. Black wants to play Nd4 or Bg3-winning the e file. White knight is standing now very unlucky on the a2 squere. Carlsen is showing us not a great play in this game till now...
22. b4 seems like White just continue playing for a win - it might be not the best idea... I think now after a simple 22...Nd4 23.Kb1 b6 Black should have a nice position
22... Nd4+ 23. Kb1 Nb3 23...Nb3 is looking to me a bit stronge...why not a simple 23...b6. 24.Bc3 seems to be logical and strong now, probably Black wants to play 24...Be5 in hope to exchange the Black squered bishops, which is normally very positive for them, but White got 25.Bc2! So what is Blacks idea on 24.Bc3 I guess we will see duing next minutes
24. Bc3 cxb4 25. Nxb4 Be5 I think Black position should be still fine, but somehow White got now a theoretical chance in beeing better. They just need to get out the Black knight from the b3 squere and play the b4...
26. Na2 Bxc3 27. Nxc3 Ndc5 28. Rxe8+ Rxe8 29. Bc2 Re3 The game is getting more exiting. Probably White will take now on 30.Bxb3 Nxb3 31.Kc2 and b4. Black will try to get a counterplay by playing Rg3. I think position is still equal, but Paco has just 10 min for the next 10 moves...so maybe White could find a change to make a use out of it... as we remeber from the first "round" in Brazil, Carlsen played a great game with Black, was very close to winning and blundered a piece in one move... so for sure he wants a revange today! Also interesting move for White is now 30.d6. Probably 30...Rg3 would be Blacks reply. Position is really getting sharp
30. Ka2 Na5 Magnus is going for the complication, probably now 31.Rd4 will follow. Well logical desicion seeing Vallejos time...
31. Rd4 maybe now 31...b6 is making sence. Also a good move by Black 31...Rg3!
31... Rg3 now after 32.Ne4 Nxe4 33.Bxe4 Nb3! Black are doign more than fine. Black knight is going to the perfect squere c5, after Black would play a5-defending against b4, then Kd7-d6 and have a clearly very nice position. What to do for White. Of course Carlsen doesnt want to play Ne4, but what else to do? seems like 30.Ka2 was a wrong way to go...
32. Ne4 Rxg2 What a blunder by Paco! Unbelievable! Black are blundering White's Rd2 and are having now a totally lost position. Amazing. Vallejo is returning Carlse the favour from the first "round" in Brazil... Chess is a strange game. You can play a great game and throw it away in one move, which can be even obvious
33. Rd2 Rxd2 the funny thing is: in the first "round" Carlsen made such a blunder after which he could resign immediatly. Now Vallejo is immitating his style from Brazil.
34. Nxd2 b5 35. b4 Nab7 36. bxc5 Nxc5 I think now after 37.Ne4 Black will resign...
37. Ne4 Nb7 The position is looking completly hopeless, after 37.Ne4 Nxe4 38.Bxe4 Bxc4 39.Kc3 Kd7 30.Kc3 White kind is going to take Blacks pawns, first c4, then a6. Black got no counterplay at all. At Blacks f5 White are just putting their bishop to g2 and Black are hopeless.
38. c5 37...Nb7 was last trick, Black wants to play at 38.c5 f5 with some chances
38... f5 39. c6 fxe4 40. cxb7+ Kxb7 41. Bxe4 So we are over the time control, White position is totally winning. White is moving its King to d4, blocking Blacks a-b pawns with the bishop, and slowly pushing the Black's king to d8 and promoting a queen. Very painful loss for Vallejo, 32...Rg2?? amazing blonder. After a good defence and not a very good play of White, in already at least equal position to make such a blunder is horrible news for any player...
41... Kc7 42. Kb3 a5 43. Kc3 a4 44. Bc2 g5 45. Kd4 Kd6 46. Bd1 And Carlsen wins the game, chasing the top position at Bilbao Grand Slam. 1-0


V. Ivanchuk (UKR) vs V. Anand (IND)


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. Nc3 Bb7 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 Be7 7. Qc2 c5 8. dxc5 bxc5 9. e3 O-O 10. Be2 d6 11. O-O Nbd7 12. Rfd1 Qb6 13. Rd2 Rfd8 14. Rad1 a6 15. h3 Bc6 16. Ne1 Qc7 17. Bf3 Ne5 18. Bxc6 Qxc6 19. b3 Ra7 20. Bg3 Qc8 21. Na4 Re8 22. Bh4 Ned7 23. Nc3 Ra8 24. f4 Qc7 25. Nf3 Rad8 26. e4 Nb8 27. e5 dxe5 28. fxe5 Rxd2 29. Qxd2 Rd8 30. Qe1 Rxd1 31. Nxd1 Nh7 32. Bxe7 Qxe7 33. Nf2 Qc7 34. Ne4 Nf8 35. h4 Nbd7 36. Nf2 Ng6 37. Nd3 Ne7 38. Qe4 Qc6 39. Nf2 Qxe4 40. Nxe4 Nc6 41. Kf2 Kf8 42. g4 Ke7 43. g5 a5 44. Ke3 Ncxe5 45. Nxe5 Nxe5 46. Nxc5 hxg5 47. hxg5 f5 48. gxf6+ gxf6 49. a3 f5 50. Kd4 Nc6+ 51. Kc3 Kd6 52. b4 axb4+ 53. axb4 e5 54. Nb3 e4 55. b5 Nd8 56. c5+ Kd5 57. Nd4 Kxc5 58. Nxf5 Nb7 ½-½

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Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 V. Ivanchuk 14 45
2 M. Carlsen 11 43.5
H. Nakamura 11 40.5
4 V. Anand 9 40
5 L. Aronian 8 31.5
6 F. Vallejo 7 29

Games in PGN: http://www.2seeitlive.co.uk/twic/assets/files/pgn/finalmast11.pgn
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:27 pm

F. Vallejo (ESP) vs H. Nakamura (USA)


1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. d4 O-O 6. Be2 Nbd7 7. Be3 e5 8. O-O Re8 9. dxe5 dxe5 10. b4 c6 11. c5 Nh5 12. Nd2 Nf4 13. Nc4 Nxe2+ 14. Qxe2 Qe7 15. Rab1 Nf8 16. Nd6 Rd8 17. Na4 Ne6 18. Nb2 b5 19. a4 a6 20. Ra1 Rb8 21. axb5 axb5 22. Ra3 Nf4 23. Qd2 Be6 24. g3 Nh5 25. Rfa1 Nf6 26. Bg5 Qf8 27. Bxf6 Bxf6 28. Nd3 Be7 29. Nxe5 Bxd6 30. cxd6 Rxd6 31. Qc3 Rbd8 32. h4 Qe8 33. Ra6 f6 34. Nf3 Bg4 35. Qb3+ Kh8 36. Nh2 Qxe4 37. Nxg4 Qxg4 38. Qf7 Qf3 39. Rf1 Rd1 40. Ra1 1-0


L. Aronian (ARM) vs V. Anand (IND)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e4 Bb4 6. Bxc4 Nxe4 7. O-O Nf6 8. Qa4+ Nc6 9. Bg5 Be7 10. Bxf6 Bxf6 11. d5 exd5 12. Rfe1+ Be6 13. Bxd5 O-O 14. Bxe6 fxe6 15. Rad1 Qe8 16. Ne4 Qe7 17. Qb3 Rab8 18. Nxf6+ Rxf6 19. Ng5 Qb4 20. Qc2 Rg6 21. Re4 Qa5 22. h4 Re8 23. Rd7 h6 24. b4 Qf5 25. Rxe6 1-0




M. Carlsen (NOR) vs V. Ivanchuk (UKR)

1. d4 This is the direct clash for the first place, Ivanchuk being in the favorable position, that is why we can expect a sharp game by Magnus.
1... Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 We are seeing Nimzo on the board, with possibility to continue with Ragozin if ...d5 is played now.
4... b6 Nimzo continues, expected is the popular Qc2 move. Queen is best placed on c2, just as explained by GM Henrik Danielsen here
5. Qc2 Bb7 So far a repetition of Carlsen - Anand
6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 Usualy one of the main ideas in this kind of position is to take advatage of the pair of bishops ,especially white wants to activaite dark square bishop and retreat the bishop on b7
7... Ne4 Ivanchuk deviates, in view of Carlsen's last game. There after O-O came Bg5. Coincidence for me to comment two games of Carlsen, and both to be in the same opening, but luckily they will be different from early stage. Last time Carlsen chose Bg5 plan. Today we will see Bg5 or g3-Bg2 probably is better than b4-Bb2 comapred to the line 1d4-Nf6 2c4-e6 3 Nf3-Bb4 4 Nbd2 white plays without tempo. This time on the board we have ...Ne4 interesting idea, Ivanchuk is going to play a similar setup to 1d4-Nf6 2c4-e6 3 Nf3-Bb4 4 Nbd2 but with tempo up for him. After Ne4 he avoids Bg5 plan now Magnus might chose g3-Bg2
8. Qc2 f5 9. g3 Yes, Magnus goes for the plan mentioned with g3-Bg2
9... Nf6 After 9...Nf6 Black has to retreat the knight because after Bg2 white has idea play Ng5 or Nd2. Usually, the bishop will come to e4 square.
10. Bh3 The idea of this move is simple : normally black puts the bishop on e4 and main idea of white is improve position in the center like Nd2-f3-e4-d5 taking space and activaiting the dark square bishop, but after Nd2 black can exchanges white square bishops on g2. After that white loses the advatage of pair of bishops. So with Bh3 probably Magnus wants to play Nd2 at some point without exchanging bishops.
10... O-O 11. O-O Now maybe Qe8-Qh5 plan is not bad.
11... a5 After 11...a5 move usually white has to play b3 to avoid a4 move because after a4 black fixes the structure on the queen side and for white is much harder to improve the position there, Magnus can play 12. b3 or maybe just not lose time and try somehow in the center ( d4-d5 )
12. Rd1 Probably he is going for d5 without any b3-Bb2. When the bishop is on b2 white in many cases can sacrafice pawn after d5 and get active play and pressing by diagonal a1-h8
12... Qe8 Now d5 looks natural.
13. d5 Black will go for Na6-Nc5
13... Na6 Now is interesting to see where Magnus will put his bishops (b3-Bb2 or Bf4), but Capablanca said that bishop is a piece that is developed at all time.
14. Bf4 14. Bf4 Qh5 15. Bg2 exd5 16. Nd4 with unclear position. Maybe now 14...Rc8 to protect on c7 and try Nc5-Ne4 and if 15. d6 then 15...e5!? Anoth option is or 14...d6 15. dxe6 Be4 16. Qc3 Nc5 and in this case the bishop on f4 looks worse than on b2. Also if 14...d6 15. Ng5 Nc5 16. b4 h6 17. bxc5 hxg5 18. Bxg5 with some complications on the board. Usually in this kind of position black tries to put pawns on dark squares (for example d6-e5) to reduce activity of white dark square bishop and white tries to put on white squares to do the same with the bishop on b7. In some cases when the bishop is on b2 and white plays d5, black respond e5, then white tries to play f4 to open diagonal a1-h8
14... exd5 Positional mistake by Ivanchuk, the position gets opened and the bishops become very strong.
15. Bxf5 dxc4 16. Ng5 white can get strong attack. Also now 16. Qxc4 gives white advantage because after exchange in center position is more open and white bishops are stronger. 16Ng5 g6 17.Bxd7! ,Nxd7 18. Qc4 Kg7 19. Ne6 Kh8 20. Rxd7 Qxd7 21. Nxf8 Rxf8 22. Be5 +-
16. Ng5 16Ng5 Qh5 17. Rd4! with some idea Rh4 and other pieces coming to press the black king. White pieces get very active and now it is hard to defend the black king, also the knight on a6 is bit far from fight.
16... Qh5 17. Rxd7 or 17. Rd4 both moves looks promissing for white
17. Rxd7 Of course more human move is 17.Rxd7 but let's give chance to Magnus to show his great calculation skills. Black has to play 17...Kh8 if 17...Nxd7 then 18. Bxh7 Kh8 19. Bg6 and black loses queen.
17... Kh8 Now white has a few moves,18. Rd4 looks natural, but also 18. Rad1 is interesting because if black wins the exchange after 18...Nxd7 black king will be weaker (knight on f6 helps defend) and white should easily get the final attack against king.
18. Re7 Nd5 19. Bg4 Qg6 20. Nf7 Kg8 21. Bf5 Qxf5 22. Qxf5 Nxe7 23. Nh6 ghx6 24. Qg4 Ng6 25. Bxh6 Rf7 26. f4 with pressure, 26...Re8 27. h5 Bc8 28. Qxc4 Ne5 and black still fighting. Magnus is choosing beetwen 19. Bg4 and 19. Re5. Note: Next event for Carlsen and Ivanchuk: Mikhail Tal 2011, later Ivanchuk also plays ETCC 2011.
19. Bg4 Qg6 Following the line in the commentary above.
20. Nf7+ Kg8 21. Bf5 or repetition after 21. Nh6 Kh8 22. Nf7
21. Bf5 Qxf5 22. Qxf5 Nxe7 23. Nh6+ gxh6 24. Qg4+ Ng6 25. Bxh6 Rf7 Black has a lot pieces for a queen, but problem for them is king sfety and very weak dark squares around it. White also has a lot of pawns on king side which he can improve (it is good to put pawns on white squares)
26. Rd1 The next will be h4-h5, black must hurry to improve pieces and get some coordiation of them like Re8-Nc5, Bc8 etc...
26... Re8 27. h4 Nc5 28. h5 Bc8 29. Qxc4 The position is unpleasant for black because white controls the dark squares, my intuition says that one of white's ideas can be to include the rook somehow to press the black king, also what I said before white can put pawns on white squares like h5-f3-g4 to take more space. More important is not to put pawns on dark squares because then black can have great blockade on white squares and chance for conterplay.
29... Ne5 30. Qh4 Nc6 30...Nc6 looks strange, black should keep pieces closer to the weak king. Now as I said before white can play Rd5 and include the rook in the attack to the black king. Anyway, with so little time it is hard to defend the position for Ivanchuk.
31. Rd5 Ne6 32. Qc4 Ncd8 a mistake now white can play 33. Qg4 Kh8 34. Bd2 with idea Bc3
33. Qg4+ Ng7 34. Qxc8 And Magnus Carlsen wins the game to tie with Ivanchuk at the top position and make the last round of the event very exciting. 1-0

Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 M. Carlsen 14 63.5
V. Ivanchuk 14 51
3 H. Nakamura 11 49.5
L. Aronian 11 48
5 F. Vallejo 10 44.5
6 V. Anand 9 47.5



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games in pgn: http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/assets/files/pgn/finalmast11_8.pgn
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:03 pm

H. Nakamura (USA) vs M. Carlsen (NOR)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 another game of Queen's Gambit. After a terrible lost on time, for sure Nakamura is today in a super agressive mood. We will see a fighting game until the end - without any doubt!
5... h6 6. Bh4 O-O 7. e3 b6 8. cxd5 Nxd5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Nxd5 exd5 11. Qb3 Be6 We are still in the theoretical part of the games. The positional evaluation is very little better for White, and of course Blacks position is very solid and safe. 11.Rc1 seems to be the main move here, but Nakamura includes 11.Qb3 Be6 and now 12.Rc1
12. Rc1 This position has never been tested now on a high level. I guess the idea of 11.Qb3 is a try of preventing Black from playing the logical c5. Now at 12...c5 White might try 13.Qa3!? and it is not so easy for Black to get out of the pin. In case Black would try to play 13...Nd7 14.Bb5! and White are doing clearly better. So probably 12...c5 13.Qa3 Rc8 should be the main, but we will see very soon what would be idea of Nakamura here, I guess that 12...c5 should be played anyhow by Black. So maybe first 12...Rc8 might be an option, but somehow it is looking a bit "unnatural"
12... Rc8 well, I am not very lucky in guessing moves, so 12...Rc8. Maybe now White could try to play 13.Ne5 ( threat is to play Nc6 with clearly better position) so 13...c5 will be almost forces and 14.Qa3 proving the opening idea, but it seems that Black might be equalizing after 14...Kf8! protecting the Queen on e7 and preparing the simple cxd4 after Which an equal endgame might arrive.
13. Bd3 a "waiting" move by Nakamura 13.Bd3. In my opinion now Black should be doing fine, maybe just an easy 14...a5 ( 14...Nd7 15.Ba6 might lead to a better position for White ) 15.O-O Nd7 and next Kf8 should give Black a confortable play
13... c5 14. Qa3 Kf8 14...Kf8! good move by Carlsen. now Black probably wants to play c4, which would lead to a please endgame for them
15. dxc5 not the greatest thing to do, but what else could White choose?! Black's threat c4 is very powerful.
15... bxc5 16. Bb5 only chance left. Instead 16. O-O Nd7 would give Black a comfotable play, Black's knight would find an exellent position on b6
16... Nd7 17. Bxd7 Bxd7 18. O-O The position is equal. Black could try now to equalize completly by playing 18...Bg4. White would have a choise of plying 19.Nd2 Rab8 - which would lead to a never better (drawish) position and 19.Rfd1 Bxf3 20.gxf3 Qd6 should lead in my opinion to position which is very close to a draw
18... a5 after a long thinking Carlsen decides to play 18...a5, which is of cours in general a good move, Black wants to put their pawn on a4, then to play Rab8 targetting the White b2 pawn, but White could try to be quick now and play 19.Rc3 followed by Rfc1. 19.Rc3 a4 20.Rfc1 c4 21.Qxe7 Kxe7 22. Nd4 Rcb8 and because of the weak pawn on b2 Black should manage to make a draw
19. Rfd1 Be6 Nakamura decided to include Rfd1-Be6 before playing Rc3, hard to say Why Blacks bishop should stand worse on e6 then on d7, but maybe Nakamura will show us why...
20. Rc3 a4 21. h3 Rab8 White are trying to get a minmal advantage. Idea is simple, to provoke Black into playing c4 move, then put their knigh to d4 and at some moment to play b3, exchange both rook and try to win position knight against bad Black bishop.
22. Rd2 And just as the games are going I have the following news coming, to the team of CE that has been commenting the whole tournament for you, we have a new additions - GM Miton and GM Ipatov. Stay tuned for the next edition:)
22... Rb4 23. Rdc2 c4 We have a bit funny position, Black arrested the White Queen on the square a3 where it has zero possible moves, but of course Black's position is not better. Only White can play for a win
24. b3 axb3 25. axb3 Rbb8 26. Qxe7+ Kxe7 27. bxc4 Rxc4 so after some exchanges, we reached the position, where White can try to play on a little, but objectivly speaking it will be most probably a draw...in best case White manage to get 4-3 pawns rook endgame which is of course draw as well
28. Nd2 Rxc3 29. Rxc3 d4 30. exd4 Rb4 31. Rd3 Kd6 32. Nf3 Bd5 33. Kh2 Be4 34. Ra3 f6 35. Ra6+ Ke7 36. Ra7+ Kf8 37. Rd7 Bc6 38. Rd6 Bxf3 39. gxf3 Ke7 40. Rd5 Ke6 41. Rd8 Ke7 42. Rd5 Ke6 43. Rd8 Ke7 And a draw was achieved. ½-½


V. Ivanchuk (UKR) vs L. Aronian (ARM)

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. Re1 We have again the very popular lately Berlin Wall. Ivanchuk decided to go for the "very solid" Re1 line instead of trying to reach something with White in the endgame after 5.d4
5... Nd6 6. Nxe5 Be7 7. Bf1 Nf5 8. Nf3 O-O 9. d4 d5 Until now we see nothing new, I played myself a few times this position with Black. According to current theory, Black have no problems at all! Now 10.c3 Bd6 11.Bd3 Nce7 would be normal continuation.
10. g3 10.g3!? here comes the Novelty! I have to say, that it is not looking like a "killer", but it seems that White are playing for a minimum advantage with a minimum risk. Maybe good desicion of Ivanchuk, who secures a second place ( and it might be even first in case Carlsen looses today)
10... Re8 10...Re8 a very logical reply. Idea of Black is to exchange as many pices as possible, which would lead to an easy draw because of the similar pawn structure of White and Black. A main Black worry is their knight on c6. So usually Black are trying to put their bishop on d6, to make e7 squere free for the knight and furfilling by playing c6 with a very safe and around equal position
11. c3 Bf8 12. Rxe8 Qxe8 now it is clear, Ivacnhuk just has choosen a super safe line, not with the idea of playing for an advantage, more to secure the tournament situation. Well, not a bad desicion, but we expected a super fighting game of him! As usual! I think Aronian went with his Bishop to f8 with the idea, at natural development of White by playing 13.Bd3 to answer Nd6 and Bf5 with totally equal position
13. Bf4 Bd6 14. Bxd6 Nxd6 15. Nbd2 2 pieces were exchanged (rooks,bishops) and still few to go untill draw agreement. I don't see a realistic chance here for a fighting game anymore... Blacks needs to make few more accurate moves to reach a complete equality.
15... Be6 16. Qb3 not much is going on here, Black wants to finish their development by playing Qd7-Re8, can White find a way to play for a win here?! I strongly doubt it... An idea for White could be to play Ne5 at some good moment, but this always can be countered by simple Nxe5 dxe5 and Nf5 which would give Black a very nice position
16... Na5 now a possible draw would be 17.Qb4 Nc6 18.Qb3 Na5, but maybe actually Black could try to play a little by playing 17...b6, , so maybe a safer way to a draw 17.Qc2 Bf5 18.Bd3 with a "total" draw
17. Qa3 Nac4 18. Nxc4 Nxc4 19. Qb3 Qc6 what to say, the game is not becoming more spectacular. Black are fulfiling the development, only one more more left, Re8 then Black can play f6-Kf7. Position is totally equal
20. Bg2 And just as the games are going I have the following news coming, to the team of CE that has been commenting the whole tournament for you, we have a new additions - GM Miton and GM Ipatov. Stay tuned for the next edition:)
20... Re8 21. Re1 Bc8 every move in the game brings the players closer to shake hands...
22. Qc2 Rxe1+ 23. Nxe1 Qe8 24. Nf3 c6 25. Bf1 h6 26. Nd2 Nxd2 27. Qxd2 Bf5 28. f3 g5 29. Kf2 f6 30. Qe3 Qh5 what is Black doing? 30...Qh5 a try to play for a win? a very strange decision. I don't see any chances for Black to achieve that. 31. Kg1 is looking nice very nice
31. Qe7 31.Qe7 securing immediate draw, 31...Qxh2 32.Bg2 Bh3 33.Qe8 with a perpetual check
31... Qxh2+ 32. Bg2 Bh3 33. Qe8+ Kg7 34. Qe7+ Kg8 35. Qe8+ And a draw was achieved. ½-½


V. Anand (IND) vs F. Vallejo (ESP)


1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 dxc4 4. e4 b5 5. a4 b4 6. Nce2 Ba6 7. Nf3 e6 8. Ng3 c5 9. d5 Be7 10. Bf4 exd5 11. Qxd5 Qxd5 12. exd5 Nh6 13. O-O-O O-O 14. Bxh6 gxh6 15. Nf5 Bf6 16. Nxh6+ Kg7 17. Nf5+ Kg6 18. g4 c3 19. bxc3 bxc3 20. Bxa6 Nxa6 21. d6 h5 22. Ne7+ Kh7 23. Rd5 Nb4 24. Rxh5+ Kg7 25. Nf5+ Kg8 26. g5 Bd4 27. Rg1 Rab8 28. g6 Nd3+ 29. Kc2 Nf4 30. N3xd4 cxd4 31. Rh8+ Kxh8 32. g7+ Kg8 33. gxf8=Q+ Kxf8 34. Nxd4 Nd5 35. Nb5 Rc8 36. Rg4 a5 37. Nc7 Nxc7 38. Rc4 Ke8 39. dxc7 1-0


tie break: M. Carlsen (NOR) vs V. Ivanchuk (UKR)

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 b6 5. Qc2 Bb7 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 d6 8. g3 Nbd7 9. Bg2 a5 10. b3 O-O 11. O-O Qb8 12. Re1 Re8 13. Bb2 Be4 14. Bf1 e5 15. Nd2 exd4 16. Qxd4 Bc6 17. e4 b5 18. cxb5 Bxb5 19. Bg2 Ne5 20. Rad1 Nd3 21. Re3 Nxb2 22. Qxb2 Ng4 23. Rc3 Qb6 24. Nc4 Bxc4 25. Rxc4 Rab8 26. Rc3 Re7 27. Qc2 g6 28. h3 Nf6 29. Kh2 h5 30. f4 Qb5 31. Rd4 Qb6 32. Qd3 Rbe8 33. e5 dxe5 34. fxe5 Nh7 35. Rc6 Qa7 36. Qc4 Nf8 37. Ra6 Qb8 38. Ra8 Qb6 39. Ra6 Qb8 40. Bc6 Rxe5 41. Bxe8 Qxe8 42. Rd2 Ne6 43. Rf2 Qd7 44. Qc3 Nd4 45. Raf6 Rf5 46. R6xf5 Nxf5 47. Rd2 Qe7 48. Rf2 Qxa3 49. g4 Qd6+ 50. Kg2 Nh4+ 51. Kg1 hxg4 52. hxg4 Qd1+ 53. Kh2 Qxg4 54. Qg3 Qxg3+ 55. Kxg3 Nf5+ 56. Kf4 Nd4 57. Rb2 Ne6+ 58. Ke5 Kg7 59. Ra2 g5 60. Rxa5 Kg6 61. Ra8 Kg7 62. b4 Nf4 63. Kf5 Ne6 64. Rc8 g4 65. Kxg4 Kf6 66. Kf3 Ke5 67. Ke3 Kd5 68. Kd3 f5 69. Rh8 Nf4+ 70. Ke3 Ke5 71. b5 Ne6 72. Kd3 Kd5 73. Kc3 Kc5 74. Re8 Nf4 75. Re5+ Nd5+ 76. Kd3 c6 77. bxc6 Kxc6 78. Rxf5 Kd6 79. Ke4 ½-½

V. Ivanchuk (UKR) vs M. Carlsen (NOR)
tie break 2

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Be3 Qe7 6. Bxc6 bxc6 7. Bxc5 Qxc5 8. Nc3 O-O 9. O-O Rb8 10. Qd2 Qe7 11. b3 c5 12. h3 d6 13. Nh2 Nh5 14. Nd5 Qd8 15. Rae1 Be6 16. Nc3 f5 17. exf5 Bxf5 18. f3 Bg6 19. Rf2 Qh4 20. Nd5 Rf7 21. Qc3 c6 22. Ne3 Nf4 23. Qd2 Rbf8 24. Nd1 h5 25. Nc3 Bf5 26. Ne2 Ne6 27. Qe3 Rf6 28. Kh1 Rg6 29. Rg1 Nc7 30. Rgf1 Nd5 31. Qd2 Rgf6 32. Nc3 Nf4 33. Ne4 Rg6 34. Rg1 Qd8 35. Nf1 Qe7 36. Nfg3 d5 37. Nxf5 Rxf5 38. Nc3 Qh4 39. Kh2 Qg3+ 0-1


http://livechess.chessdom.com/site/


Standings
# Name ELO Pts S-B
1 M. Carlsen 19 102
2 V. Ivanchuk 16 73.5
3 H. Nakamura 12 67
L. Aronian 12 66
V. Anand 12 65
6 F. Vallejo 10 53


Games in PGN: http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/assets/files/pgn/finalmast11.pgn

Playoff Games in PGN: http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/assets/files/pgn/finalmastp11.pgn


Last edited by ciccio on Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:25 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : added games links)
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

Post by ciccio on Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:12 pm

congratulation to Carlsen for winning the tourney!
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Re: São Paulo Masters - Bilbao 2011

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